Tags: devices

Description

On June 30, 1948, AT&T Bell Labs unveiled the transitor to the world, creating a spark of explosive economic growth that would lead into the Information Age. William Shockley led a team of researchers, including Walter Brattain and John Bardeen, who invented the device. Like the existing triode vacuum tube device, the transistor could amplify signals and switch currents on and off, but the transistor was smaller, cheaper, and more efficient. Moreover, it could be integrated with millions of other transistors onto a single chip, creating the integrated circuit at the heart of modern computers.

Today, most transistors are being manufactured with a minimum feature size of 60-90nm--roughly 200-300 atoms. As the push continues to make devices even smaller, researchers must account for quantum mechanical effects in the device behavior. With fewer and fewer atoms, the positions of impurities and other irregularities begin to matter, and device reliability becomes an issue. So rather than shrink existing devices, many researchers are working on entirely new devices, based on carbon nanotubes, spintronics, molecular conduction, and other nanotechnologies.

Learn more about transistors from the many resources on this site, listed below. Use our simulation tools to simulate performance characteristics for your own devices.

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  1. NCN Nano-Devices for Medicine and Biology: Simulation Tools for Education

    19 Jun 2008 |

    Many simulation tools are available on the nanoHUB. The tools have been well-tested and here include supporting materials so that they can be effectively used for education or intelligently used for research.

  2. NCN Nano-Devices for Medicine and Biology: Simulation Tools for Research

    19 Jun 2008 |

    Many simulation tools are available on the nanoHUB. The tools have been well-tested and here include supporting materials so that they can be effectively used for research. The research tools include a first time users guide and supporting publications and theses.

  3. NCN Nano-Devices for Medicine and Biology: Tutorials

    19 Jun 2008 |

    From among the many tutorial lectures available on the nanoHUB, we list a few that convey new approaches to the development of new kinds of devices for applications in medicine and biology.

  4. High-Aspect-Ratio Micromachining of Titanium: Enabling New Functionality and Opportunity in Micromechanical Systems Through Greater Materials Selection

    18 Jun 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Masa Rao

    Traditionally, materials selection has been limited in high-aspect-ratio micromechanical applications, due primarily to the predominance of microfabrication processes and infrastructure dedicated to silicon. While silicon has proven to be an excellent material for many of these applications, no...

  5. Silicon Spintronics

    04 Jun 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Ian Appelbaum

    "Electronics" uses our ability to control electrons with electric fields via interaction with their fundamental charge. Because we can manipulate the electric fields within semiconductors, they are the basis for microelectronics, and silicon (Si) is the most widely-used semiconductor for...

  6. Nanoscale Opto Thermo Electric Energy Conversion Devices

    28 May 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Ali Shakouri

    We review solid-state devices that allow direct conversion of heat into electricity. We describe fundamental and practical limits of conventional thermoelectric materials. Novel metal-semiconductor nanocomposites are developed where the heat and charge transport are modified at the atomic level....

  7. Ashish Agrawal

    http://nanohub.org/members/28577

  8. Matdcal

    30 Jan 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Kirk Bevan

    Non-equilibrium Green's Function Density Functional Theory Simulator

  9. Functionalized Nanomaterials at the Interface of Biology and Technology

    24 Apr 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Dean Ho, National Center for Learning & Teaching in Nanosca

    Nanomaterials, such as block copolymeric membranes and nanodiamonds, can be engineered for a broad range of applications in energy and medicine. This presentation will highlight the relevance of these materials as foundations for device fabrication across the spectrum of biology and technology....

  10. Nanoelectronic Modeling: Multimillion Atom Simulations, Transport, and HPC Scaling to 23,000 Processors

    07 Mar 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Gerhard Klimeck

    Future field effect transistors will be on the same length scales as “esoteric” devices such as quantum dots, nanowires, ultra-scaled quantum wells, and resonant tunneling diodes. In those structures the behavior of carriers and their interaction with their environment need to be fundamentally...

  11. Quantum and Semi-classical Electrostatics Simulation of SOI Trigates

    19 Feb 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Hyung-Seok Hahm, Andres Godoy

    Generate quantum/semi-classical electrostatic simulation results for a simple Trigate structure

  12. What Promises do Nanotubes and Nanowires Hold for Future Nanoelectronics Applications?

    18 Feb 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Joerg Appenzeller

    Various low-dimensional materials are currently explored for future electronics applications. The common ground for all these structures is that the surface related impact can no longer be ignored – the common approach applied to predict properties of bulk-type three-dimensional (3D) materials....

  13. TCAD Revisited, 2007: An Engineer’s Point of View

    19 Dec 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Constantin Bulucea

    This presentation was one of 13 presentations in the one-day forum, "Excellence in Computer Simulation," which brought together a broad set of experts to reflect on the future of computational science and engineering.

  14. Reliability Physics of Nanoscale Transistors

    27 Nov 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Muhammad A. Alam

    This course is now offered on nanoHUB as ECE 695A Reliability Physics of Nanotransistors.

  15. MCW07 Impact of Porphyrin Functional Groups on InAs Gas Sensors

    05 Nov 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Michael Garcia

    Porphyrin molecules are often used for sensor engineering to improve sensitivity and selectivity to specific analytes. It is important to understand how the porphyrin HOMO-LUMO levels deplete surface states during functionalization of solid state sensors. Additionally, the effect of...

  16. Silicon Photonics: Opportunity Challenges and Recent Results

    02 Nov 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Mario Paniccia

    The silicon chip has been the mainstay of the electronics industry for the last 40 years and has revolutionized the way the world operates. Today a silicon chip the size of a fingernail contains nearly one billion transistors and has the computing power that only a decade ago would take up an...

  17. Hexagonal Prism Blue Diode Laser Using Whispering Gallery Mode (WGM) Resonances

    23 Oct 2007 | | Contributor(s):: sangho kim

    Semiconductor lasers have many important applications, including communication technologies, optical storage, printing, and molecular detection. The range of applications could be broadened significantly if the lasers could be made smaller and with lower threshold currents. Today’s in-plane...

  18. Introduction of MEMS Activity at Nano/Micro System Engineering Lab., Kyoto University

    15 Sep 2007 | | Contributor(s):: OSAMU TABATA

    We are aiming at the realization of microsystems and nanosystems with novel and unique functions by integrating functional elements in different domains such as mechanics, electronics, chemistry, optics and biotechnology. These micro/nano systems are expected to be novel machines, which will...

  19. MCW07 Modeling Charging-based Switching in Molecular Transport Junctions

    23 Aug 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Sina Yeganeh, , Mark Ratner

    We will discuss several proposed explanations for the switching and negative differential resistance behavior seen in some molecular junctions. It is shown that a proposed polaron model is successful in predicting both hysteresis and NDR behavior, and the model is elaborated with image charge...

  20. Electronics From the Bottom Up: top-down/bottom-up views of length

    17 Aug 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Muhammad A. Alam

    When devices get small stochastic effects become important. Random dopant effects lead to uncertainties in a MOSFET’s threshold voltage and gate oxides breakdown is a random process. Even a concept as simple as “channel length” becomes uncertain. This short (20 min) talk, a footnote to the...