Tags: molecular electronics

Description

In 1959, physicist Richard Feynman presented an amazing talk entitled There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom, in which he proposed making very small circuits out of molecules. More than forty years later, people are starting to realize his vision. Thanks to Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) probes and "self-assembly" fabrication techniques, it is now possible to connect electrodes to a molecule and measure its conductance. In 2004, Mark Hersam et al. reported the first experimental measurement of a molecular resonant tunneling device on silicon. This new field of Molecular Electronics may someday provide the means to miniaturize circuits beyond the limits of silicon, keeping Moore's Law in force for many years to come.

Learn more about molecular electronics from the resources on this site, listed below. More information on Molecular electronics can be found here.

Teaching Materials (1-4 of 4)

  1. ABINIT: First-Time User Guide

    09 Jun 2009 | | Contributor(s):: Benjamin P Haley

    This first-time user guide provides an introduction to using ABINIT on nanoHUB. We include a very brief summary of Density Functional Theory along with a tour of the Rappture interface. We discuss the default simulation (what happens if you don't change any inputs, and just hit "simulate") as...

  2. Computational Chemistry: An Introduction to Molecular Dynamic Simulations

    08 Dec 2006 | | Contributor(s):: Shalayna Lair

    This module gives a brief overview of computational chemistry, a branch of chemistry concerned with theoretically determining properties of molecules. The fundamentals of how to conduct a computational project are discussed as well as the variety of different models that can be used. Because of...

  3. Coordinate file of xylyl molecule

    08 Feb 2013 | | Contributor(s):: Rahul Jain, vinay krishna polnati (editor), Venkat Rayudu

    we are designing molecular device using xylyl molecule.so here we would like to upload the coordinate file of this molecule so that it can be simulated.

  4. Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    12 Dec 2006 | | Contributor(s):: Lynn Marie Santiago

    This is the fourth contribution from the students in the University of Texas at El Paso Molecular Electronics course given in the fall of 2006.This presentation is presented at the undergraduate level and introduces spectroscopic ellipsometry, which is one of the most important characterization...