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Tags: nano electro-mechanical systems

Description

Nano Electro-Mechanical Systems (NEMS) are tiny machines built at the nanometer scale. Current NEMS applications are simple machines, such as the tiny cantilever shown at the right. An electrical circuit measures the deflection of the lever. A larger version of this device, with dimensions at the micrometer or millimeter scale, is commonly used as an airbag sensor in automobiles. A sudden stop causes a strong deflection of the lever, which signals that the airbags should be deployed. At the nano scale, such a lever is sensitive enough to measure the weight of individual atoms or molecules resting upon it.

Learn more about NEMS from the resources available on this site, listed below.

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  1. 2004 Linking Bio and Nano Symposium

    26 Jul 2004 | Workshops

    Explore ways universities can work together in Bio-NanoTechnology. Discover research opportunities in this emerging area. Network with professionals and researchers who share common interests....

    http://nanohub.org/resources/135

  2. REBO Nanofluidics Exercise

    10 May 2006 | Teaching Materials | Contributor(s): Susan Sinnott, Hetal Patel

    Nanofluidics exercise showing the variation of energy and position of methane and butane molecules flowing through an opened carbon nanotube as the system temperature and the length of the...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/1270

  3. SURI 2003 Conference

    07 Aug 2003 | Workshops

    2003 SURI Conference Proceedings

    http://nanohub.org/resources/134

  4. Nanoelectronics/Mechanics With Carbon Nanotubes

    26 Feb 2004 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Ji-Yong Park

    In this talk, I will present efforts to understand electrical/mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by combining electric transport measurements and the scanning probe microscopy.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/157

  5. Quantum Electromechanical Systems: Are we there yet?

    05 Feb 2004 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Andrew Cleland

    Electrons moving in a conductor can transfer momentum to the lattice via collisions with impurities and boundaries, giving rise to a fluctuating mechanical stress tensor. Driving electrons out of...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/151

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