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Tags: nanoelectronics

Description

Progress in technology has brought microelectronics to the nanoscale, but nanoelectronics is not yet a well-defined engineering discipline with a coherent, experimentally verified, theoretical framework. The NCN has a vision for a new, 'bottom-up' approach to electronics, which involves: understanding electronic conduction at the atomistic level; formulating new simulation techniques; developing a new generation of software tools; and bringing this new understanding and perspective into the classroom. We address problems in atomistic phenomena, quantum transport, percolative transport in inhomogeneous media, reliability, and the connection of nanoelectronics to new problems such as biology, medicine, and energy. We work closely with experimentalists to understand nanoscale phenomena and to explore new device concepts. In the course of this work, we produce open source software tools and educational resources that we share with the community through the nanoHUB.

This page is a starting point for nanoHUB users interested in nanoelectronics. It lists key resources developed by the NCN Nanoelectronics team. The nanoHUB contains many more resources for nanoelectronics, and they can be located with the nanoHUB search function. To find all nanoelectronics resources, search for 'nanoelectronics.' To find those contributed by the NCN nanoelectronics team, search for 'NCNnanoelectronics.' More information on Nanoelectronics can be found here.

All Categories (1841-1858 of 1858)

  1. 2003 Summer Institute Wokshop on Molecular Conduction

    09 Jul 2003 | Workshops

    The tutorials supplied below were part of the Molecular Conduction Workshop held at Purdue University in July of 2003.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/420

  2. A Personal Quest for Information

    19 Feb 2004 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Vwani P. Roychowdhury

    This talk will report results and conclusions from my personal investigations into several different disciplines, carried out with the unifying intent of uncovering some of the fundamental...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/155

  3. Digital Electronics: Fundamental Limits and Future Prospects

    20 Jan 2004 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Konstantin K. Likharev

    I will review some old and some recent work on the fundamental (and not so fundamental) limits imposed by physics of electron devices on their density and power consumption.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/149

  4. Contacting Molecules - Chemistry in Molecular Electronics

    12 Apr 2004 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Ilona Kretzschmar

    The study of the basic electron transport mechanism through molecular systems has been made accessible by fabrication techniques that create metallic contacts to a small number of organic...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/160

  5. Electronic Transport in Semi-conducting Carbon Nanotube Transistor Devices

    16 Oct 2003 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Joerg Appenzeller

    Recent demonstrations of high performance carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFETs) highlight their potential for a future nanotube-based electronics. Besides being just a nanometer in...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/147

  6. Electronic Transport Through Self-Assembled Monolayers

    25 Feb 2004 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Takhee Lee

    Characterization of charge transport in molecular scale electronic devices has to date shown exquisite sensitivity to specifics of device fabrication and preparation. Thus, intrinsic molecular...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/156

  7. Molecular Electronics Pathway for Molecular Memory Devices

    06 Feb 2004 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Ranganathan Shashidhar

    We have been developing a scale molecular electronic device using a 30 nm sized plant virus particle as the scaffold. This talk describes the bioengineering aspects of how the virus particle is...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/153

  8. Nanoelectronic Scaling Tradeoffs: What does Physics Have to Say?

    23 Sep 2003 | Presentation Materials | Contributor(s): Victor Zhirnov

    Beyond CMOS, several completely new approaches to information-processing and data-storage technologies and architectures are emerging to address the timeframe beyond the current SIA International...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/146

  9. Nanoelectronics and the Future of Microelectronics

    22 Aug 2002 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Mark Lundstrom

    Progress in silicon technology continues to outpace the historic pace of Moore's Law, but the end of device scaling now seems to be only 10-15 years away. As a result, there is intense interest in...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/141

  10. Quantum-dot Cellular Automata

    24 Nov 2003 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Craig S. Lent

    The multiple challenges presented by the problem of scaling transistor sizes are all related to the fact that transistors encode binary information by the state of a current switch. What is...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/148

  11. Towards a Terahertz Solid State Bloch Oscillator

    29 Jan 2004 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): S. James Allen

    The concepts of Bloch oscillation and Zener breakdown are fundamental to electron motion in periodic potentials and were described in the earliest theoretical developments of electron transport in...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/150

  12. Inelastic Effects in Molecular Conduction

    12 Apr 2004 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Abraham Nitzan

    Molecular electron transfer, as treated by the Marcus theory, strongly depends on nuclear motion as a way to achieve critical configurations in which charge rearrangement is possible. The electron...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/159

  13. Electrical Conduction through Molecules

    08 Jul 2003 | Papers | Contributor(s): Ferdows Zahid, Magnus Paulsson, Supriyo Datta

    In recent years, several experimental groups have reported measurements of the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of individual or small numbers of molecules. Even three-terminal measurements...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/124

  14. Mini-Workshop on Carbon-Nanotube FETs

    13 May 2003 | Workshops

    This informal one-day workshop was intended to discuss theory, modeling, and simulation for CNT-electronics, specifically FETs. The objective was to kick off an NSF-funded project on the modeling...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/132

  15. Resistance of a Molecule

    29 Apr 2003 | Papers | Contributor(s): Magnus Paulsson, Ferdows Zahid, Supriyo Datta

    In recent years, several experimental groups have reported measurements of the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of individual or small numbers of molecules. Even three-terminal measurements...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/123

  16. Joseph M. Cychosz

    Joe Cychosz began his computing career in 1974 at the University of Illinois where he became an electrical engineer by degree and a programmer by trade while working with the Control Data computer...

    http://nanohub.org/members/4994

  17. Theory of Ballistic Nanotransistors

    27 Nov 2002 | Papers | Contributor(s): Anisur Rahman, Jing Guo, Supriyo Datta, Mark Lundstrom

    Numerical simulations are used to guide the development of a simple analytical theory for ballistic field-effect transistors. When two-dimensional electrostatic effects are small, (and when the...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/122

  18. Panagiotis Dimitrakis

    Dr. Panagiotis Dimitrakis received the B.Sc. and the M.Sc. degrees in Physics from the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece, in 1996 and 1998 respectively and Ph.D. degree from...

    http://nanohub.org/members/5703

nanoHUB.org, a resource for nanoscience and nanotechnology, is supported by the National Science Foundation and other funding agencies. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.