Tags: nanomedicine

Description

Nanomedicine is the medical application of nanotechnology. Nanomedicine ranges from the medical applications of nanomaterials, to nanoelectronic biosensors, and even possible future applications of molecular nanotechnology. Current problems for nanomedicine involve understanding the issues related to toxicity and environmental impact of nanoscale materials. More information on Nanomedicine can be found here.

All Categories (121-140 of 180)

  1. BME 695N Lecture 17: Assessing nanotoxicity at the single cell level

    06 Nov 2007 | | Contributor(s):: James Leary

    Outline:Outline – the need for single cell measures of nanotoxicity There is more than one way for a cell to die... Necrosis" vs. "Apoptosis" There are other forms of "toxicity" Some other challenges in measuring toxicity of nanomaterialsNecrosis vs. Apoptosis mechanisms Necrosis is unplanned...

  2. BME 695N Lecture 16: Assessing drug efficacy at the single cell level

    02 Nov 2007 | | Contributor(s):: James Leary

    Outline:Introduction and overviewNanomedical treatment at the single cell level requires evaluation at the single cell levelFor evaluation purposes, does structure reveal function?The difficulty of anything but simple functional assaysThe need for assays which at least show correlation to...

  3. BME 695N Lecture 15: Nanodelivery of therapeutic genes & molecular biosensor feedback control systems

    30 Oct 2007 | | Contributor(s):: James Leary

    Outline:Introduction and overviewSome of the advantages of therapeutic genesSome of the advantages of molecular biosensor feedback control systemsWhy a nanodelivery approach is appropriateThe therapeutic gene approachWhat constitutes a "therapeutic gene" ?Transient versus stable expression...

  4. BME 695N Lecture 14: Challenges of proper drug dosing with nanodelivery systems

    29 Oct 2007 | | Contributor(s):: James Leary

    Outline:Overview of drug dosing problemProblems of scaling up doses from animal systemsBasing dosing on size, area, weight of recipientVast differences between adults in terms of genetics, metabolismDosing in children – children are NOT smaller adults!Pharmacokinetics – drug distribution,...

  5. KIST/PU Design and Performance of Bioresponsive Nanocarriers with Tunable Reactivity for Drug and Gene Delivery

    23 Oct 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Dave Thompson

    Our lab has focused on the development of bioresponsive nanocarriers that are designed to release their cargo upon entry into acidic environments such as those found in cellular endosomes and sites of poor circulation. Computational methods have been used to design vinyl ether lipids of varying...

  6. KIST/PU Bridging Nonlinear Optical Imaging and Nanotechnology with Medicine

    23 Oct 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Ji-Xin Cheng

    Our interdisciplinary research develops and utilizes state-of-the-art optical imaging techniques and nanotechnology to tackle compelling biomedical problems highly related to human health. Research in my group covers diagnosis, treatment, and mechanistic study of diseases.

  7. KIST/PU Multi-Component, Multi-Functional Nanomedical Systems for Drug/Gene Delivery

    23 Oct 2007 | | Contributor(s):: James Leary

    In this brief paper we describe some of our recent efforts to construct multi-component, multi-functional nanomedical systems for delivery of therapeutic genes. We first describe the general philosophy of our approach. Then we describe three specific aspects of the overall construction in simple...

  8. KIST/PU Tumor-Homing Chitosan-Based Nanoparticles for Cancer Theragnosis; Imaging, Drug Delivery and Therapy

    23 Oct 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Ick Chan Kwon

    We have prepared self-assembled polymeric drug carriers containing fluorophore and loaded drugs for theragnostic imaging of tumors. This new type of polymeric drug carriers visualizes the accumulation of carriers at tumor sites, and evaluates therapeutic efficacies, and thereby providing an...

  9. KIST/PU Introduction to Global Research Laboratory (GRL) Program: Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine for Theragnosis using Nano-Bio Materials

    23 Oct 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Kui Won Choi

    The Global Research Laboratory (GRL) program was initiated by the Korea Foundation for International Cooperation of Science and Technology (KICOS) in 2006. The GRL program has been designed to develop fundamental and original technologies through international collaborative research between...

  10. KIST/PU 2nd Annual Symposium: Molecular Imaging and Theragnosis

    23 Oct 2007 |

    This symposium presents an overview of the research of the Global Research Laboratory (GRL), a program that reflects a direct collaboration of scientific research between South Korea (Korea Institute of Science and Technology [KIST] and its affiliated research institutions) and the United States...

  11. BME 695N Lecture 12: Introduction to X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and the Examples of Biologically-Relevant Applications

    19 Oct 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Dmitry Zemlyanov

    With Dmitry Zemlyanov as guest lecturer.

  12. BME 695N Lecture 11: Construction of biomolecule conjugated nanoparticles

    30 Sep 2007 |

    With Donald E. Bergstrom as guest lecturer.

  13. BME 695N Lecture 9: Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for Nanomedical Systems (cells and nanoparticles)

    30 Sep 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Helen McNally

    What Helen McNally as guest lecturer.

  14. BME 695N Lecture 6: Rare-event targeting of cells in-vitro and in-vivo

    26 Sep 2007 | | Contributor(s):: James Leary

    Outline:Assessing nanomedical system (NMS) targeting at the single cell levelFluorescent labeling of NMSsFirst estimates of NMS binding by fluorescence microscopyInternal of external binding by confocal microscopySingle-cell image/confocal analysisFlow cytometric quantitation of NMS binding to...

  15. BME 695N Lecture 10: Nanomaterials for core design

    26 Sep 2007 | | Contributor(s):: James Leary

    Outline:IntroductionCore building blocksFunctional coresFunctionalizing the core surfaceFerric oxide coresParamagnetic coresSuperparamagnetic coresFerric nanorodsAdvantages and disadvantagesC60 and carbon nanotubesSize and structure of C60Elongation of C60 into carbon nanotubesAdvantages and...

  16. BME 695N Lecture 8: Technologies for measuring nanomedical systems on/within cells

    24 Sep 2007 | | Contributor(s):: James Leary

    Outline:Introduction to measuring technologies for nanomedical system interaction with cellsThe importance of quantitative or at least semi-quantitative single cell measurementsto detect presence and location of nanomedical systemsBelow "optical limit" imagingRequirements on the NMS to have...

  17. BME 695N Lecture 7: Normal & facilitated cell entry mechanisms

    15 Sep 2007 | | Contributor(s):: James Leary

    Outline:IntroductionThe general problem of cell entryChoosing modes of cell entryHow does Nature do it? (biomimetics)Non-specific uptake mechanismsPinocytosis by all cellsPhagocytosis by some cellsReceptor mediated uptakeReceptor mediated transport of desired moleculesExample- transferrin...

  18. BME 695N Lecture 5: Cell Targeting

    12 Sep 2007 | | Contributor(s):: James Leary

    Outline:Overview: targeting nanosystems to cellsAntibody targetingPeptide targetingAptamer targetingAntibodies – polyclonal and monoclonalWhere do antibodies come from – in nature?How do we make them in the laboratory?Monoclonal antibodiesTherapy problems with mouse monoclonal...

  19. BME 695N Lecture 4: Designing "Theragnostic" Systems

    04 Sep 2007 | | Contributor(s):: James Leary

    Outline:Bridging the gap between diagnostics and therapeuticsHow conventional medicine is practiced in terms of diagnostics and therapeuticsThe consequences of separating diagnostics and therapeuticsA new approach – "theragnostics" (or "theranostics")Examples of current theragnostic...

  20. BME 695N Lecture 3: Overview of Basic Nanomedical Systems Design

    29 Aug 2007 | | Contributor(s):: James Leary

    Outline:Nanomedical systems – levels of challengesEssential elements of a nanomedical systemRequirements for specific cell targetingConsequences of mis-targetingEngineering around the consequences of mis-targetingSome ways to lower mis-targeting to non-diseased cells