Support

Support Options

Submit a Support Ticket

 

Tags: nanowires

Description

A nanowire is a nanostructure, with the diameter of the order of a nanometer. Alternatively, nanowires can be defined as structures that have a thickness or diameter constrained to tens of nanometers or less and an unconstrained length. At these scales, quantum mechanical effects are important.

Learn more about quantum dots from the many resources on this site, listed below. More information on Nanowires can be found here.

Resources (1-20 of 83)

  1. OMEN Nanowire: solve the challenge

    05 Feb 2011 | Teaching Materials | Contributor(s): SungGeun Kim

    This document includes a challenging problems for OMEN Nanowire users. It challenges users to establish a nanowire transistor structure such that it satisfy the ITRS 2010 requirements.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/10764

  2. OMEN Nanowire Homework Problems

    24 Jan 2011 | Teaching Materials | Contributor(s): SungGeun Kim

    OMEN Nanowire homework problems: anyone who has gone through the first-time user guide of OMEN Nanowire and done the examples in the guide should be able to run simulations in these homework...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/10512

  3. Nanotechnology Animation Gallery

    22 Apr 2010 | Teaching Materials | Contributor(s): Saumitra Raj Mehrotra, Gerhard Klimeck

    Animations and visualization are generated with various nanoHUB.org tools to enable insight into nanotechnology and nanoscience. Click on image for detailed description and larger image download....

    http://nanohub.org/resources/8882

  4. Notes on Scattering and Mobility in 1D, 2D, and 3D

    06 Nov 2009 | Teaching Materials | Contributor(s): Dmitri Nikonov, Md. Sayed Hasan, George Bourianoff

    Derivation of the phonon-limited mobility is reviewed for electrons in bulk (3D) or quantum confined (2D and 1D) semiconductor structures. Analytical estimates are made that show the mobility in...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/7737

  5. Band Structure Lab: First-Time User Guide

    15 Jun 2009 | Teaching Materials | Contributor(s): Abhijeet Paul, Benjamin P Haley, Gerhard Klimeck

    This document provides useful information about Band Structure Lab. First-time users will find basic ideas about the physics behind the tool such as band formation, the Hamiltonian description,...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/6935

  6. OMEN Nanowire: First-Time User Guide

    23 Feb 2009 | Teaching Materials | Contributor(s): SungGeun Kim, Benjamin P Haley, Mathieu Luisier, Saumitra Raj Mehrotra, Gerhard Klimeck

    This is the first-time user guide for OMEN Nanowire. In addition to showing how the tool operates, it briefly explains what the OMEN Nanowire is, what it can do, and the input and output...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/6318

  7. Can we define unique effective masses in Si nanowires?

    06 Jul 2008 | Teaching Materials | Contributor(s): Dragica Vasileska, Gerhard Klimeck

    This exercise teaches the users that for small nanostructures the concept of the effective mass becomes vague and in order to properly describe nanostructures one has to take into account the...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/4880

  8. Nanowire: First-Time User Guide

    05 May 2008 | Teaching Materials | Contributor(s): Gerhard Klimeck, Saumitra Raj Mehrotra

    Nanowire is a simulation tool for silicon nanowire FET's in the nanometer regime (diameter

    http://nanohub.org/resources/4531

  9. MuGFET: First-Time User Guide

    28 Apr 2008 | Teaching Materials | Contributor(s): SungGeun Kim, Sriraman Damodaran, Benjamin P Haley, Gerhard Klimeck

    MuGFET is a simulation tool for nano-scale multi-gate FET structures. This document provides instructions on how to use MuGFET. MuGFET users can use also the PROPHET or the PADRE tool. Either...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/4470

nanoHUB.org, a resource for nanoscience and nanotechnology, is supported by the National Science Foundation and other funding agencies. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.