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Tags: parallel programming

Description

A parallel programming model is a set of software technologies to express parallel algorithms and match applications with the underlying parallel systems. It encloses the areas of applications, programming languages, compilers, libraries, communications systems, and parallel I/O. Due to the difficulties in automatic parallelization today, people have to choose a proper parallel programming model or a form of mixture of them to develop their parallel applications on a particular platform.

Learn more about quantum dots from the many resources on this site, listed below. More information on Parallel Programming can be found here.

Resources (1-20 of 20)

  1. Challenges and Strategies for High End Computing

    20 Dec 2007 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Katherine A. Yelick

    This presentation was one of 13 presentations in the one-day forum, "Excellence in Computer Simulation," which brought together a broad set of experts to reflect on the future of...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/3706

  2. HPCW High-end HPC Architectures

    09 Oct 2007 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Mithuna Thottethodi

    http://nanohub.org/resources/3346

  3. HPCW Introduction to Parallel Programming with MPI

    05 Dec 2007 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): David Seaman

    Single-session course illustrating message-passing techniques. The examples include point-to-point and collective communication using blocking and nonblocking transmission. One application...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/3357

  4. HPCW Parallel Programming Models

    09 Oct 2007 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Sam Midkiff

    Computing Research Institute Rosen Center for Advanced Computing

    http://nanohub.org/resources/3341

  5. Illinois ECE 498AL: Programming Massively Parallel Processors, Lecture 10: Control Flow

    01 Sep 2009 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Wen-Mei W Hwu

    Control Flow Topics: Terminology Review How Thread Blocks are Partitioned Control Flow Instructions Parallel Reduction A Vector Reduction Example A simple Implementation Vector...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/7304

  6. Illinois ECE 498AL: Programming Massively Parallel Processors, Lecture 6: CUDA Memories - Part 2

    20 Aug 2009 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Wen-Mei W Hwu

    CUDA Memories Part2 Topics: Tiled Multiply Breaking Md and Nd into Tiles Tiled Matrix Multiplication Kernel CUDA Code - Kernel Execution Configuration First Order Size considerations...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/7247

  7. Illinois ECE 498AL: Programming Massively Parallel Processors, Lecture 9: Memory Hardware in G80

    30 Aug 2009 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Wen-Mei W Hwu

    Memory Hardware in G80 Topics: CUDA Device Memory Space Parallel Memory Sharing SM Memory Architecture SM Register File Programmer view of Register File Matrix Multiplication...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/7277

  8. Introduction to Parallel Programming with MPI

    24 Nov 2008 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): David Seaman

    Single-session course illustrating message-passing techniques. The examples include point-to-point and collective communication using blocking and nonblocking transmission. One application...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/5932

  9. Introduction to TotalView

    24 Nov 2008 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): David Seaman

    This single-session course presents an introduction to the use of the TotalView parallel debugger available on Purdue's Linux systems.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/5942

  10. Mathematica for CUDA and OpenCL Programming

    07 Mar 2011 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Ulises Cervantes-Pimentel, Abdul Dakkak

    In the latest release of Mathematica 8, a large number of programming tools for GPU computing are available. In this presentation, new tools for CUDA and OpenCL programming will be explored....

    http://nanohub.org/resources/10940

  11. MPI for the Next Generation of Supercomputing

    05 Dec 2008 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Andrew Lumsdaine

    Despite premature rumours of its demise, MPI continues to be the de facto standard for high-performance parallel computing. Nonetheless, supercomputing software and the high-end ecosystem continue...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/5639

  12. Nanoelectronic Modeling: Multimillion Atom Simulations, Transport, and HPC Scaling to 23,000 Processors

    07 Mar 2008 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Gerhard Klimeck

    Future field effect transistors will be on the same length scales as “esoteric” devices such as quantum dots, nanowires, ultra-scaled quantum wells, and resonant tunneling diodes. In those...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/3988

  13. OpenMP Tutorial

    25 Nov 2008 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Seung-Jai Min

    This tutorial consists of three parts. First, we will discuss about how OpenMP is typically used and explain OpenMP programming model. Second, we will describe important OpenMP constructs and...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/5874

  14. Session 3: Discussion

    20 Dec 2007 | Online Presentations

    Discussion led by Jim Demmel, University of California at Berkeley.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/3734

  15. Software Productivity Tools

    24 Nov 2008 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): David Seaman

    This presentation briefly describes the use of tar(1), make(1), the Portable Batch System (PBS), and two version control systems: CVS and subversion.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/5937

  16. The Multicore Era: Crisis or (and?) Opportunity?

    27 Mar 2009 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Mithuna Thottethodi

    This talk will provide a brief overview of how we got to the multicore era, the implications and challenges for hardware/software developers and users, and some informed speculation on where the...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/6523

nanoHUB.org, a resource for nanoscience and nanotechnology, is supported by the National Science Foundation and other funding agencies. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.