Tags: proteins

Description

Proteins are organic compounds made of amino acids arranged in a linear chain and folded into a globular form. The amino acids in a polymer are joined together by the peptide bonds between the carboxyl and amino groups of adjacent amino acid residues. The sequence of amino acids in a protein is defined by the sequence of a gene, which is encoded in the genetic code.

Learn more about quantum dots from the many resources on this site, listed below. More information on Proteins can be found here.

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  1. DNA to Protein Overview Learning Module

    28 Aug 2017 | | Contributor(s):: Southwest Center for Microsystems Education (SCME)

    This learning module provides information needed to understand how the digitally encoded information in DNA is translated into a functional protein that can be used for biomedical applications.  Activities delve deeper into protein structure and function as well as gene transcription.

  2. DNA to Protein Overview Learning Module - Instructor Guides

    28 Aug 2017 | | Contributor(s):: Southwest Center for Microsystems Education (SCME)

    This learning module provides information needed to understand how the digitally encoded information in DNA is translated into a functional protein that can be used for biomedical applications.  Activities delve deeper into protein structure and function as well as gene transcription.

  3. Carbon Dioxide Gating in Silk Cocoon

    21 Aug 2012 | | Contributor(s):: sunil kumar meena

    Silk is the generic name given to the fibrous proteins spun by a number of arthropods. During metamorphosis, the larva of the silk producing arthropods excrete silk-fiber from its mouth and spun it around the body to form a protective structure called cocoon. An adult moth emerges out from the...

  4. Appreciating Nature's Antibiotics as Chemical Treasures

    12 Jul 2011 | | Contributor(s):: Christopher T. Walsh

    This lecture is part of the 28th Annual H.C. Brown Lectures in Organic Chemistry.

  5. BioInspired Solutions to Engineering Problems

    18 Feb 2011 | | Contributor(s):: Carlo Montemagno

    Carlo Montemagno presented a research seminar to the BioEnegineering and MEMS programs at the University of Louisville on February 16, 2011. The talk is available as steaming video athttp://louisville.edu/television/bioengineering.021611.asxwith permission granted by C. Montemagno, R. Cohn and...

  6. Illinois Phys550 Molecular Biophysics Lecture 16: Mechanical Function of Proteins

    07 Apr 2010 | | Contributor(s):: Klaus Schulten

  7. Cagri Savran

    Dr. Savran received his BSME from Purdue University in 1998, and his SM and PhD from MIT in 2000 and 2004. He is currently assistant professor of mechanical engineering with courtesy appointments...

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  8. Basic Rules of Protein Folding

    31 Dec 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Seth Lichter

    How are proteins made? Inside cells, messenger RNA first instructs the ribosomes as to the order which amino acids should be joined together. Linked together and released from the ribosome, the protein is not functional. It now needs to fold into a precise three-dimensional shape. There are no...

  9. Cataract, Myopathy and Keratitis: Possible use of Nanoparticles

    16 Sep 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Ch. Mohan Rao

    Small heat shock proteins are critical for several cellular functions. Failure of heat shock proteins, thus, can cause compromised cellular activity leading to disease. Fungal Keratitis is an eye dieses that can be treated with anti fungal drugs. Availability of the drug at the site of action is...

  10. Self-association of peptides and proteins: Retrospect and prospects

    30 Jul 2008 | | Contributor(s):: R. Nagaraj

    The ability of peptides and proteins to form aggregates was known from the dawn of protein and peptide chemistry! It was often considered a nuisance and attention was directed towards disaggregating them to ensure dissolution particularly in aqueous solution. X-ray crystallography has indicated...

  11. Nanobiotechnology – a different perspective

    22 Jul 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Murali Sastry

    The study of the synthesis, exotic properties, assembly/packaging and potential commercial application of nanomaterials is an extremely important topic of research that is expected to have far-reaching global impact. The focus of my talk will be on an emerging branch of nanotechnology that...

  12. Ionic Selectivity in Channels: complex biology created by the balance of simple physics

    05 Jun 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Bob Eisenberg

    An important class of biological molecules—proteins called ionic channels—conduct ions (like Na+ , K+ , Ca2+ , and Cl− ) through a narrow tunnel of fixed charge (‘doping’). Ionic channels control the movement of electric charge and current across biological membranes and so play a role in...

  13. Some Physics for Proteins

    03 Jun 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Stephen M. Durbin

  14. Computational Nanoscience, Lecture 27: Simulating Water and Examples in Computational Biology

    16 May 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Elif Ertekin, Jeffrey C Grossman

    In this lecture, we describe the challenges in simulating water and introduce both explicit and implicit approaches. We also briefly describe protein structure, the Levinthal paradox, and simulations of proteins and protein structure using First Principles approaches and Monte Carlo...

  15. Bionanotechnology: a different perspective

    30 Apr 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Murali Sastry

    The study of the synthesis, exotic properties, assembly/packaging and potential commercial application of nanomaterials is an extremely important topic of research that is expected to have far-reaching global impact. The focus of my talk will be on an emerging branch of nanotechnology that...

  16. Functionalized Nanomaterials at the Interface of Biology and Technology

    24 Apr 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Dean Ho, National Center for Learning & Teaching in Nanosca

    Nanomaterials, such as block copolymeric membranes and nanodiamonds, can be engineered for a broad range of applications in energy and medicine. This presentation will highlight the relevance of these materials as foundations for device fabrication across the spectrum of biology and technology....

  17. Modeling (Semi) Unstructured Proteins

    26 Mar 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Michael Colvin

    The past century has seen tremendous progress in determining the biochemical and biophysical processes that constitute life. One exciting consequence of this understanding is the possibility of developing mathematical models of biological function that are accurate and even predictive. My...

  18. Madhanagopal B

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  19. Combining New Experimental and Informatic Tools for Protein Investigation and Engineering

    09 Jan 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Alan Friedman

    The stability and activity of proteins is dependent on both the correct functioning and placement of individual amino acids and their interactions. Great attention has been paid to critical individual residues (generally revealed by their location in the active site and their conservation among...

  20. SPMW Single molecule recognition atomic force microscopy

    05 Jan 2007 | | Contributor(s)::

    In molecular recognition force microscopy (MRFM), ligands are covalently attached to atomic force microscopy tips for the molecular recognition of their cognitive receptors on probe surfaces. A ligand-containing tip is approached towards the receptors on the probe surface, which possibly leads...