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Tags: quantum computing

Description

First proposed in the 1970s, quantum computing relies on quantum physics by taking advantage of certain quantum physics properties of atoms or nuclei that allow them to work together as quantum bits, or qubits, to be the computer's processor and memory. By interacting with each other while being isolated from the external environment, qubits can perform certain calculations exponentially faster than conventional computers.

Learn more about quantum dots from the many resources on this site, listed below. More information on Quantum computing can be found here.

Resources (21-24 of 24)

  1. A Primer on Quantum Computing

    18 Oct 2006 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): David D. Nolte

    Quantum computers would represent an exponential increase in computing power...if they can be built. This tutorial describes the theoretical background to quantum computing, its potential for...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/1897

  2. Einstein/Bohr Debate and Quantum Computing

    10 May 2005 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Karl Hess

    This presentation deals with the Einstein/Bohr Debate and Quantum Computing.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/384

  3. Nanotechnology: Silicon Technology, Bio-molecules and Quantum Computing

    13 May 2005 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Karl Hess

    Nanotechnology: Silicon Technology, Bio-molecules and Quantum Computing

    http://nanohub.org/resources/387

  4. Control of Exchange Interaction in a Double Dot System

    05 Feb 2004 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Mike Stopa

    As Rolf Landauer observed in 1960, information is physical. As a consequence, the transport and processing of information must obey the laws of physics. It therefore makes sense to base the laws...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/152

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