Tags: quantum computing

Description

First proposed in the 1970s, quantum computing relies on quantum physics by taking advantage of certain quantum physics properties of atoms or nuclei that allow them to work together as quantum bits, or qubits, to be the computer's processor and memory. By interacting with each other while being isolated from the external environment, qubits can perform certain calculations exponentially faster than conventional computers.

Learn more about quantum dots from the many resources on this site, listed below. More information on Quantum computing can be found here.

Resources (21-31 of 31)

  1. Northwestern University Initiative for Teaching Nanoscience

    12 Aug 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Baudilio Tejerina

    This package allows users to study and analyze of molecular properties using various electronic structure methods.

  2. Spin Coupled Quantum Dots

    09 Jul 2008 | | Contributor(s):: John Shumway, Matthew Gilbert

    Path integral calculation of exchange coupling of spins in neighboring quantum dots.

  3. MCW07 A Quantum Open Systems Approach to Molecular-Scale Devices

    25 Feb 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Yongqiang Xue

    Experimental advances in electrically and optically probing individual molecules have provided new insights into the behavior of single quantum objects and their interaction with the nanoenvironments without requiring ensemble average. Molecular-scale devices are open quantum systems whose...

  4. MCW07 Physics of Contact Induced Current Asymmetry in Transport Through Molecules

    25 Feb 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Bhaskaran Muralidharan, owen miller, Neeti Kapur, Avik Ghosh, Supriyo Datta

    We first outline the qualitatively different physics involved in the charging-induced current asymmetries in molecular conductors operating in the strongly coupled (weakly interacting) self-consistent field (SCF) and the weakly coupled (strongly interacting) Coulomb Blockade (CB) regimes. The CB...

  5. High Precision Quantum Control of Single Donor Spins in Silicon

    14 Jan 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Rajib Rahman, marta prada, Gerhard Klimeck, Lloyd Hollenberg

    The Stark shift of the hyperfine coupling constant is investigated for a P donor in Si far below the ionization regime in the presence of interfaces using tight-binding and band minima basis approaches and compared to the recent precision measurements. In contrast with previous effective...

  6. RMRLS 0.2

    27 Dec 2007 | | Contributor(s):: James Donald, Pallav Gupta

    Reed-Muller Reversible Logic Synthesis tool (aka RELOS) is a tool for the synthesis of reversible functions based on positive-polarity Reed-Muller expressions. The second release of RMRLS a.k.a. RELOS features reversible logic synthesis with SWAP, Fredkin, and Peres gates.This work was done...

  7. Reed-Muller Reversible Logic Synthesizer (RMRLS) 0.2

    04 Jan 2008 | | Contributor(s):: James Donald, Pallav Gupta

    Reed-Muller Reversible Logic Synthesis tool (a.k.a. RELOS) is a tool for the synthesis of reversible functions based on positive-polarity Reed-Muller expressions. The second release of RMRLS features reversible logic synthesis with SWAP, Fredkin, and Peres gates. This work was done under the...

  8. A Primer on Quantum Computing

    18 Oct 2006 | | Contributor(s):: David D. Nolte

    Quantum computers would represent an exponential increase in computing power...if they can be built. This tutorial describes the theoretical background to quantum computing, its potential for several specific applications, and the demanding challenges facing practical implementation. The field...

  9. Einstein/Bohr Debate and Quantum Computing

    10 May 2005 |

    This presentation deals with the Einstein/Bohr Debate and Quantum Computing.

  10. Nanotechnology: Silicon Technology, Bio-molecules and Quantum Computing

    13 May 2005 |

    Nanotechnology: Silicon Technology, Bio-molecules and Quantum Computing

  11. Control of Exchange Interaction in a Double Dot System

    05 Feb 2004 | | Contributor(s):: Mike Stopa

    As Rolf Landauer observed in 1960, information is physical. As a consequence, the transport and processing of information must obey the laws of physics. It therefore makes sense to base the laws of information processing and computation on the laws of physics and in particular on quantum...