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Tags: quantum computing

Description

First proposed in the 1970s, quantum computing relies on quantum physics by taking advantage of certain quantum physics properties of atoms or nuclei that allow them to work together as quantum bits, or qubits, to be the computer's processor and memory. By interacting with each other while being isolated from the external environment, qubits can perform certain calculations exponentially faster than conventional computers.

Learn more about quantum dots from the many resources on this site, listed below. More information on Quantum computing can be found here.

Resources (1-20 of 24)

  1. Northwestern University Initiative for Teaching Nanoscience

    12 Aug 2008 | Tools | Contributor(s): Baudilio Tejerina

    This package allows users to study and analyze of molecular properties using various electronic structure methods.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/nuitns

  2. Quantum Dot Quantum Computation Simulator

    04 Aug 2012 | Tools | Contributor(s): Brian Sutton

    Performs simulations of quantum dot quantum computation using a model Hamiltonian with an on-site magnetic field and modulated inter-dot exchange interaction.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/qudosim

  3. Spin Coupled Quantum Dots

    09 Jul 2008 | Tools | Contributor(s): John Shumway, Matthew Gilbert

    Path integral calculation of exchange coupling of spins in neighboring quantum dots.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/spincoupleddots

  4. Thermoelectric Power Factor Calculator for Superlattices

    18 Oct 2008 | Tools | Contributor(s): Terence Musho, Greg Walker

    Quantum Simulation of the Seebeck Coefficient and Electrical Conductivity in 1D Superlattice Structures using Non-Equilibrium Green's Functions

    http://nanohub.org/resources/slpf

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