Tags: quantum dots

Description

Quantum dots have a small, countable number of electrons confined in a small space. Their electrons are confined by having a tiny bit of conducting material surrounded on all sides by an insulating material. If the insulator is strong enough, and the conducting volume is small enough, then the confinement will force the electrons to have discrete (quantized) energy levels. These energy levels can influence the device behavior at a macroscopic scale, showing up, for example, as peaks in the conductance. Because of the quantized energy levels, quantum dots have been called "artificial atoms." Neighboring, weakly-coupled quantum dots have been called "artificial molecules."

Learn more about quantum dots from the many resources on this site, listed below. More information on Quantum dots can be found here.

Resources (61-80 of 92)

  1. Quantum Dot Lab

    12 Nov 2005 | | Contributor(s):: Prasad Sarangapani, James Fonseca, Daniel F Mejia, James Charles, Woody Gilbertson, Tarek Ahmed Ameen, Hesameddin Ilatikhameneh, Andrew Roché, Lars Bjaalie, Sebastian Steiger, David Ebert, Matteo Mannino, Hong-Hyun Park, Tillmann Christoph Kubis, Michael Povolotskyi, Michael McLennan, Gerhard Klimeck

    Compute the eigenstates of a particle in a box of various shapes including domes, pyramids and multilayer structures.

  2. Quantum Dot Lab - A Novel Visualization Tool using Jupyter

    07 Oct 2017 | | Contributor(s):: Khaled Aboumerhi

    As semiconductor devices scale down into the nano regime, deep understanding of quantum mechanical properties of nano-structures become increasingly essential. Quantum dots are famous examples of such nano-structures. Quantum dots have attracted a lot of attention over the last two decades due...

  3. Quantum Dot Lab Demonstration: Pyramidal Qdots

    03 Jun 2009 | | Contributor(s):: Gerhard Klimeck, Benjamin P Haley

    This video shows the simulation and analysis of a pyramid-shaped quantum dot using Quantum Dot Lab. Several powerful analytic features of this tool are demonstrated.

  4. Quantum Dot Lab Learning Module: An Introduction

    02 Jul 2007 | | Contributor(s):: James K Fodor, Jing Guo

    THIS MATERIAL CORRESPONDS TO AN OLDER VERSION OF QUANTUM DOT LAB THAN CURRENTLY AVAILABLE ON nanoHUB.org.

  5. Quantum Dot Quantum Computation Simulator

    04 Aug 2012 | | Contributor(s):: Brian Sutton

    Performs simulations of quantum dot quantum computation using a model Hamiltonian with an on-site magnetic field and modulated inter-dot exchange interaction.

  6. Quantum Dot Spectra, Absorption, and State Symmetry: an Exercise

    30 Mar 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Gerhard Klimeck

    The tutorial questions based on the Quantum Dot Lab v1.0 available online at Quantum Dot Lab. Students are asked to explore the various different quantum dot shapes, optimize the intra-band absorption through geometry variations, and consider the concepts of state symmetry and eigenstates.NCN@Purdue

  7. Quantum Dot Wave Function (Quantum Dot Lab)

    02 Feb 2011 | | Contributor(s):: Gerhard Klimeck, David S. Ebert, Wei Qiao

    Electron density of an artificial atom. The animation sequence shows various electronic states in an Indium Arsenide (InAs)/Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) self-assembled quantum dot.

  8. Quantum Dot Wave Function (still image)

    31 Jan 2011 | | Contributor(s):: Gerhard Klimeck, David S. Ebert, Wei Qiao

    Electron density of an artificial atom. The image shown displays the excited electron state in an Indium Arsenide (InAs) / Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) self-assembled quantum dot.

  9. Quantum Dots

    21 Jul 2005 | | Contributor(s):: Gerhard Klimeck

    Quantum Dots are man-made artificial atoms that confine electrons to a small space. As such, they have atomic-like behavior and enable the study of quantum mechanical effects on a length scale that is around 100 times larger than the pure atomic scale. Quantum dots offer application...

  10. Quantum Transport: Atom to Transistor (Spring 2004)

    23 May 2006 | | Contributor(s):: Supriyo Datta

    Spring 2004Please Note: A newer version of this course is now available and we would greatly appreciate your feedback regarding the new format and contents.Course Information WebsiteThe development of "nanotechnology" has made it possible to engineer materials and devices on a length scale as...

  11. Quantum-dot Cellular Automata

    24 Nov 2003 | | Contributor(s)::

    The multiple challenges presented by the problem of scaling transistor sizes are all related to the fact that transistors encode binary information by the state of a current switch. What is required is a new paradigm, still capable of providing general purpose digital computation, but which can...

  12. Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA) - Logic Gates

    03 Feb 2006 | | Contributor(s)::

    An earlier animation described how "Quantum-dot Cellular Automata" (QCAs) could serve as memory cells and wires. This animation contnues the story by describing how QCAs can be made into MAJORITY, OR, AND, and INVERTER logic gates.

  13. Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA) - Memory Cells

    03 Feb 2006 | | Contributor(s)::

    Scientists and engineers are looking for completely different ways of storing and analyzing information. Quantum-dot Cellular Automata are one possible solution. In computers of the future, transistors may be replaced by assemblies of quantum dots called Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCAs).This...

  14. Screening Effect on Electric Field Produced by Spontaneous Polarization in ZnO Quantum Dot in Electrolyte

    16 Dec 2015 | | Contributor(s):: Xinia Meshik, Min S. Choi, Mitra Dutta, Michael Stroscio

    IWCE 2015 presentation. in this paper, the calculation of the strength of the electrostatic field produced by zno quantum dots due to the spontaneous polarization in a physiological electrolyte and its application on retinal horizontal cells are presented.

  15. Self-Assembled Quantum Dot Structure (pyramid)

    01 Feb 2011 | | Contributor(s):: Gerhard Klimeck, Insoo Woo, Muhammad Usman, David S. Ebert

    Pyramidal InAs Quantum dot. The quantum dot is 27 atomic monolayers wide at the base and 15 atomic monolayers tall.

  16. Self-Assembled Quantum Dot Wave Structure

    31 Jan 2011 | | Contributor(s):: Gerhard Klimeck, Insoo Woo, Muhammad Usman, David S. Ebert

    A 20nm wide and 5nm high dome shaped InAs quantum dot grown on GaAs and embedded in InAlAs is visualized.

  17. Semiconductor Interfaces at the Nanoscale

    17 Oct 2005 | | Contributor(s):: David Janes

    The trend in downscaling of electronic devices and the need to add functionalities such as sensing and nonvolatile memory to existing circuitry dictate that new approaches be developed for device structures and fabrication technologies. Various device technologies are being investigated,...

  18. SEQUAL 2.1 Source Code Download

    09 Mar 2005 | | Contributor(s):: Michael McLennan

    SEQUAL 2.1 is a device simulation program that computes Semiconductor Electrostatics by Quantum Analysis. Given a device, SEQUAL will compute the electron density and the current density using a quantum mechanical, collisionless description of electron propagation. It was designed to be a...

  19. Single Electron Switching with Nano-Electromechanical Systems and Applications in Ion Channel Transport

    01 Nov 2004 | | Contributor(s):: Robert H. Blick

    Taking classes in physics always starts with Newtonian mechanics. In reducing the size of the objects considered however the transition into the quantum mechanical regime has to occur. The 'mechanics' of quantum mechanics is best studied in nano-structured semiconductor systems often termed...

  20. Structure and Morphology of Silicon Germanium Thin Films

    29 Dec 2013 | | Contributor(s):: Brian Demczyk

    Single layer silicon and germanium films as well as nominally 50-50 silicon-germanium alloys were deposited on single crystal silicon and germanium (001) and (111) substrates by ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition. These films spanned the range of + 4 % film-substrate lattice mismatch. A...