Tags: quantum dots


Quantum dots have a small, countable number of electrons confined in a small space. Their electrons are confined by having a tiny bit of conducting material surrounded on all sides by an insulating material. If the insulator is strong enough, and the conducting volume is small enough, then the confinement will force the electrons to have discrete (quantized) energy levels. These energy levels can influence the device behavior at a macroscopic scale, showing up, for example, as peaks in the conductance. Because of the quantized energy levels, quantum dots have been called "artificial atoms." Neighboring, weakly-coupled quantum dots have been called "artificial molecules."

Learn more about quantum dots from the many resources on this site, listed below. More information on Quantum dots can be found here.

Resources (81-92 of 92)

  1. Structure and Morphology of Silicon-Germanium Thin Films

    07 Feb 2015 | Contributor(s):: Brian Demczyk

    This presentation describes the growth of (Si,Ge & SiGe) thin films on Si and Ge (001) and (111) substrates by ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHVCVD). Thin films were characterized structurally by conventional and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and...

  2. Surprises on the nanoscale: Plasmonic waves that travel backward and spin birefringence without magnetic fields

    08 Jan 2007 |

    As nanonphotonics and nanoelectronics are pushed down towards the molecular scale, interesting effects emerge. We discuss how birefringence (different propagation of two polarizations) is manifested and could be useful in the future for two systems: coherent plasmonic transport of near-field...

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of CdSe Qunatum Dots

    09 Jan 2017 | | Contributor(s):: Nicholas Blake

    In this laboratory, students will study how surfactant-based chemistry can be used to synthesize CdSe quantum dots and study how the size of the quantum dots can be controlled by varying reaction time. The laboratory will  demonstrate how the color of these quantum dots can be connected to...

  4. Test for Quantum Dot Lab tool

    04 Nov 2010 | | Contributor(s):: SungGeun Kim, Saumitra Raj Mehrotra

    This test is aimed at self-learning students or instructors who may be engaged in teaching classes related to the quantum dot lab tool.The level of this test should not be difficult for a student who has gone through "the general tutorial to quantum dots,""the introductory tutorial to the...

  5. The History of Semiconductor Heterostructures Research: From Early Double Heterostructure Concept to Modern Quantum Dot Structures

    21 Jun 2011 | | Contributor(s):: Zhores I. Alferov

    It would be very difficult today to imagine solid-state physics without semiconductor heterostructures. Semiconductor heterostructures and especially double heterostructures, including quantum wells, quantum wires and quantum dots, currently comprise the object of investigation of two thirds of...

  6. Thermoelectric Power Factor Calculator for Nanocrystalline Composites

    18 Oct 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Terence Musho, Greg Walker

    Quantum Simulation of the Seebeck Coefficient and Electrical Conductivity in a 2D Nanocrystalline Composite Structure using Non-Equilibrium Green's Functions

  7. Tutorial 4b: Introduction to the NEMO3D Tool - Electronic Structure and Transport in 3D

    23 Mar 2011 | | Contributor(s):: Gerhard Klimeck

    Electronic Structure and Transport in 3D - Quantum Dots, Nanowires and Ultra-Thin Body Transistors

  8. Universal Behavior of Strain in Self-assembled Quantum Dots

    01 May 2016 | | Contributor(s):: Hesameddin Ilatikhameneh, Tarek Ahmed Ameen, Gerhard Klimeck, Rajib Rahman

    This resource contains the universal behavior strain files produced by Nemo5. Attached also a Matlab script that can utilize the these compact descriptive files to produce the full strain distribution.  Supported QD shapes; Cuboid, Dome, Cone, and Pyramid. Supported material systems;...

  9. Valley Dependent g-factors in Silicon: Role of Spin-Orbit and Micromagnets

    09 Dec 2016 | | Contributor(s):: Rajib Rahman

    In this talk I will show that spin splittings in silicon quantum dots are inherently valley-dependent. Interface disorder, such as monoatomic steps, can strongly affect the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling and can cause device-to-device variations in g-factors. I will also describe the anisotropy...

  10. Visualization of and Educational Tool for Quantum Dots

    15 Aug 2004 | | Contributor(s):: Aaron Christensen, Adrian Rios

    Quantum dots (QDs) are confined structures made of metals and semiconductors that are capable of containing free electrons.The ability to visualize these small devices is advantageous in determining probable electron orbitals and in observing information not easily conceived in raw datasets.

  11. VolQD: Graphics Hardware Accelerated Interactive Visual Analytics of Multi-million Atom Nanoelectronics Simulations

    13 Dec 2005 | | Contributor(s):: wei qiao

    In this work we present a hardware-accelerated direct volume renderingsystem for visualizing multivariate wave functions in semiconductingquantum dot (QD) simulations. The simulation datacontains the probability density values of multiple electron orbitalsfor up to tens of millions of atoms,...

  12. What Can the TEM Tell You About Your Nanomaterial?

    26 Feb 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Eric Stach

    In this tutorial, I will present a brief overview of the ways that transmission electron microscopy can be used to characterize nanoscale materials. This tutorial will emphasize what TEM does well, as well where difficulties arise. In particular, I will discuss in an overview manner how...