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Tags: quantum dots

Description

Quantum dots have a small, countable number of electrons confined in a small space. Their electrons are confined by having a tiny bit of conducting material surrounded on all sides by an insulating material. If the insulator is strong enough, and the conducting volume is small enough, then the confinement will force the electrons to have discrete (quantized) energy levels. These energy levels can influence the device behavior at a macroscopic scale, showing up, for example, as peaks in the conductance. Because of the quantized energy levels, quantum dots have been called "artificial atoms." Neighboring, weakly-coupled quantum dots have been called "artificial molecules."

Learn more about quantum dots from the many resources on this site, listed below. More information on Quantum dots can be found here.

Resources (1-20 of 87)

  1. Quantum Dot Quantum Computation Simulator

    04 Aug 2012 | Tools | Contributor(s): Brian Sutton

    Performs simulations of quantum dot quantum computation using a model Hamiltonian with an on-site magnetic field and modulated inter-dot exchange interaction.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/qudosim

  2. Thermoelectric Power Factor Calculator for Nanocrystalline Composites

    18 Oct 2008 | Tools | Contributor(s): Terence Musho, Greg Walker

    Quantum Simulation of the Seebeck Coefficient and Electrical Conductivity in a 2D Nanocrystalline Composite Structure using Non-Equilibrium Green's Functions

    http://nanohub.org/resources/nccpf

  3. Coulomb Blockade Simulation

    05 Jul 2006 | Tools | Contributor(s): Xufeng Wang, Bhaskaran Muralidharan, Gerhard Klimeck

    Simulate Coulomb Blockade through Many-Body Calculations in a single and double quantum dot system

    http://nanohub.org/resources/coulombsim

  4. Path Integral Monte Carlo

    13 Dec 2007 | Tools | Contributor(s): John Shumway, Matthew Gilbert

    Tool Description

    http://nanohub.org/resources/pimc

  5. Quantum Dot Lab

    12 Nov 2005 | Tools | Contributor(s): Prasad Sarangapani, Daniel F Mejia, Andrew Roché, Lars Bjaalie, Sebastian Steiger, David Ebert, Matteo Mannino, Hong-Hyun Park, Tillmann Christoph Kubis, James Fonseca, Michael Povolotskyi, Michael McLennan, Gerhard Klimeck

    Compute the eigenstates of a particle in a box of various shapes including domes, pyramids and multilayer structures.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/qdot

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