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Tags: quantum mechanics

Description

Quantum mechanics (QM), also known as quantum physics or quantum theory, is a branch of physics providing a mathematical description of much of the dual particle-like and wave-like behavior and interactions of energy and matter. It departs from classical mechanics primarily at the atomic and subatomic scales, the so-called quantum realm. In advanced topics of QM, some of these behaviors are macroscopic and only emerge at very low or very high energies or temperatures.

Learn more about quantum dots from the many resources on this site, listed below. More information on Quantum mechanics can be found here.

Resources (1-20 of 69)

  1. Quantum Mechanics for Engineers: Podcasts

    07 Jul 2008 | Series | Contributor(s): Dragica Vasileska, Gerhard Klimeck, David K. Ferry

    This course will introduce the students to the basic concepts and postulates of quantum mechanics. Examples will include simple systems such as particle in an infinite and finite well, 1D and 2D...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/4920

  2. Quantum Mechanics: Introductory Concepts

    07 Jul 2008 | Series | Contributor(s): Dragica Vasileska, Gerhard Klimeck, David K. Ferry

    In this section of the Quantum Mechanics class we discuss the particle-wave duality and the need for the quantization of energy to explain the black-body radiation and the photoelectric effect. We...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/4910

  3. Quantum Mechanics: Stationary Perturbation Theory

    10 Jul 2008 | Series | Contributor(s): Dragica Vasileska, Gerhard Klimeck

    Stationary perturbation theory is concerned with finding the changes in the discrete energy levels and the changes in the corresponding energy eigenfunctions of a system, when the Hamiltonian of a...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/5014

  4. Quantum Mechanics: Time Independent Schrodinger Wave Equation

    07 Jul 2008 | Series | Contributor(s): Dragica Vasileska, Gerhard Klimeck

    In physics, especially quantum mechanics, the Schrödinger equation is an equation that describes how the quantum state of a physical system changes in time. It is as central to quantum mechanics...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/4937

  5. Quantum Mechanics: Time-Dependent Perturbation Theory

    10 Jul 2008 | Series | Contributor(s): Dragica Vasileska, Gerhard Klimeck

    Time-dependent perturbation theory, developed by Paul Dirac, studies the effect of a time-dependent perturbation V(t) applied to a time-independent Hamiltonian H0. Since the perturbed Hamiltonian...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/5021

  6. Quantum Mechanics: Tunneling

    08 Jul 2008 | Series | Contributor(s): Dragica Vasileska, Gerhard Klimeck

    In quantum mechanics, quantum tunnelling is a micro nanoscopic phenomenon in which a particle violates the principles of classical mechanics by penetrating a potential barrier or impedance higher...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/4945

  7. Quantum Mechanics: Wavepackets

    07 Jul 2008 | Series | Contributor(s): Dragica Vasileska, Gerhard Klimeck

    In physics, a wave packet is an envelope or packet containing an arbitrary number of wave forms. In quantum mechanics the wave packet is ascribed a special significance: it is interpreted to be a...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/4932

  8. Quantum Mechanics: WKB Approximation

    09 Jul 2008 | Series | Contributor(s): Dragica Vasileska, Gerhard Klimeck

    In physics, the WKB (Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin) approximation, also known as WKBJ (Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin–Jeffreys) approximation, is the most familiar example of a semiclassical calculation in...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/4992

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