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Tags: scanning probe microscopy

Description

Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) is a branch of microscopy that forms images of surfaces using a physical probe that scans the specimen. An image of the surface is obtained by mechanically moving the probe in a raster scan of the specimen, line by line, and recording the probe-surface interaction as a function of position.

Learn more about quantum dots from the many resources on this site, listed below. More information on Scanning probe microscopy can be found here.

Resources (1-20 of 34)

  1. Corrosion Mechanisms in Magnetic Recording Media

    29 Jul 2013 | Presentation Materials | Contributor(s): Brian Demczyk

    This presentation describes the corrosion process in longitudinal and perpendicular recording media, based upon electron and scanning probe microscopic analysis.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/19028

  2. Atomic Force Microscope Investigations of Lubrication Layers

    26 Nov 2012 | Presentation Materials | Contributor(s): Brian Demczyk

    This presentation discusses the characterization of hard disk lubrication layers by phase contrast atomic force microscopy.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/15967

  3. Nanoscale Dimensions in Hard Disk Media

    27 Sep 2012 | Presentation Materials | Contributor(s): Brian Demczyk

    This presentation examines the relationship of longidudinal hard disk media nanostructure,lubricant distribution and surface nanoroughness to disk contact to flying time transition and lubricant...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/15322

  4. Haptic Interfaces to Scanning Probe Microscopy

    21 Apr 2004 | Presentation Materials | Contributor(s): Daniel Wilhelm

    2003 SURI Conference Proceedings

    http://nanohub.org/resources/821

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