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Tags: spintronics

Description

Spintronics (a neologism meaning "spin transport electronics"), also known as magnetoelectronics, is an emerging technology that exploits the intrinsic spin of the electron and its associated magnetic moment, in addition to its fundamental electronic charge, in solid-state devices. More information on spintronics can be found here.

Resources (21-40 of 47)

  1. Spins and Magnets (Whiteboard lecture), Part 1

    06 Jan 2009 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Supriyo Datta

    Whiteboard version of approximately the same material covered in Lectures 3A/3B.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/6041

  2. Spins and Magnets (Whiteboard lecture), Part 2

    06 Jan 2009 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Supriyo Datta

    Whiteboard version of approximately the same material covered in Lectures 3A/3B.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/6063

  3. ECE 495N Lecture 38: Spin Rotation

    29 Dec 2008 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Supriyo Datta

    http://nanohub.org/resources/6075

  4. ECE 495N Lecture 37: Spin Matrices

    15 Dec 2008 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Supriyo Datta

    http://nanohub.org/resources/6044

  5. ECE 495N Lecture 36: Spin

    10 Dec 2008 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Supriyo Datta

    http://nanohub.org/resources/6025

  6. Lecture 3A: Spin Transport

    20 Aug 2008 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Supriyo Datta

    Objective: To extend the model from Lectures 1 and 2 to include electron spin. Every electron is an elementary “magnet” with two states having opposite magnetic moments. Usually this has no...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/5269

  7. Lecture 3B: Spin Transport

    20 Aug 2008 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Supriyo Datta

    Objective: To extend the model from Lectures 1 and 2 to include electron spin. Every electron is an elementary “magnet” with two states having opposite magnetic moments. Usually this has no...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/5270

  8. Silicon Spintronics

    04 Jun 2008 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Ian Appelbaum

    "Electronics" uses our ability to control electrons with electric fields via interaction with their fundamental charge. Because we can manipulate the electric fields within semiconductors, they...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/4492

  9. The Novel Nanostructures of Carbon

    28 Feb 2008 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Gene Dresselhaus

    A brief review will be given of the physical underpinnings of carbon nanostructures that were developed over the past 60 years, starting with the electronic structure and physical properties of...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/3997

  10. Can numerical “experiments” INSPIRE physical experiments?

    20 Dec 2007 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Supriyo Datta

    This presentation was one of 13 presentations in the one-day forum, "Excellence in Computer Simulation," which brought together a broad set of experts to reflect on the future of...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/3716

  11. Surprises on the nanoscale: Plasmonic waves that travel backward and spin birefringence without magnetic fields

    08 Jan 2007 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Daniel Neuhauser

    As nanonphotonics and nanoelectronics are pushed down towards the molecular scale, interesting effects emerge. We discuss how birefringence (different propagation of two polarizations) is...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/2256

  12. Atomic Force Microscopy

    01 Dec 2005 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Arvind Raman

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is an indispensible tool in nano science for the fabrication, metrology, manipulation, and property characterization of nanostructures. This tutorial reviews some of...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/520

  13. Control of Exchange Interaction in a Double Dot System

    05 Feb 2004 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Mike Stopa

    As Rolf Landauer observed in 1960, information is physical. As a consequence, the transport and processing of information must obey the laws of physics. It therefore makes sense to base the laws...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/152

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