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Tags: wavefunction

Description

A wave function is a mathematical tool used in quantum mechanics. It is a function typically of space or momentum or spin and possibly of time that returns the probability amplitude of a position or momentum for a subatomic particle. Mathematically, it is a function from a space that maps the possible states of the system into the complex numbers. The laws of quantum mechanics (the Schrödinger equation) describe how the wave function evolves over time.

Learn more about quantum dots from the many resources on this site, listed below. More information on Wave Function can be found here.

Resources (1-20 of 21)

  1. 3D wavefunctions

    12 Apr 2010 | Animations | Contributor(s): Saumitra Raj Mehrotra, Gerhard Klimeck

    In quantum mechanics the time-independent Schrodinger's equation can be solved for eigenfunctions (also called eigenstates or wave-functions) and corresponding eigenenergies (or energy levels) for...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/8805

  2. Periodic Potential Lab Demonstration: Standard Kroenig-Penney Model

    11 Jun 2009 | Animations | Contributor(s): Gerhard Klimeck, Benjamin P Haley

    This video shows the simulation of a 1D square well using the Periodic Potential Lab. The calculated output includes plots of the allowed energybands, a table of the band edges and band gaps,...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/6839

  3. Quantum Dot Lab Demonstration: Pyramidal Qdots

    11 Jun 2009 | Animations | Contributor(s): Gerhard Klimeck, Benjamin P Haley

    This video shows the simulation and analysis of a pyramid-shaped quantum dot using Quantum Dot Lab. Several powerful analytic features of this tool are demonstrated.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/6845

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