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nanoHUB Resources for K-12

by Joseph M. Cychosz, Thochu V Phan, Margarita Shalaev

This resource is in development.

Resources for Grade School Students

Resources for Middle School Students

Resources for High School Students

Mark Ratner Interview on Nanotechnology, Mark Ratner, Northwestern University
Dr. Mark Ratner talks about what the future holds for nano technology and where it is likely to head. Dr. Ratner relates nanotechnology to other sciences and the future role of modeling.

Resources for High School Students (Advanced Study)

Resources for Teachers

Thinking Small, Carl Batt, Cornell University
Dr. Carl Batt discusses the challenges of enhancing the public’s understanding of nanotechnology and its ability to comprehend a scale of size over several orders of magnitude. Dr. Batt gives an overview of creating the traveling museum exhibit “Too Small to See,” which has successfully faced the challenges of bringing nanoscale phenomena to the human-scale.

NCLT Seminar Series
A collection of presentations hosted by the National Center for Learning and Teaching in Nanoscale Science and Engineering (NCLT) that focus on teaching NSE at the K-12 level. These presentations explore teaching methodologies and the fundamentals of NSE.

Resources for Parents

Mark Ratner Interview on Nanotechnology

Other Resources

nanooze
Created for kids, nanooze is a place to hear about the latest exciting stuff in science and technology. What kind of stuff? Discoveries about the world that is too small to see and making tiny things. You will find interesting articles about recent discoveries and what it might mean for the future.

Created on , Last modified on

nanoHUB.org, a resource for nanoscience and nanotechnology, is supported by the National Science Foundation and other funding agencies. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.