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Research

Nanoelectronics and Semiconductor Devices

Image:Things_to_Do_Website.jpgWith miniaturization of conventional electronics devices having reached the nanometer scale, nanoelectronics is an undeniable reality in today’s applications. Understanding all of the implications of “nano” when it comes to materials, devices and circuit aspects however is not a given at all. In particular, utilizing novel – often quantum mechanical – aspects of the nano-realm for electronics applications is an area that is still in its infancies. BNC researchers are exploring nanoelectronics aspects from a variety of different angles. The goal is to utilize “nano” through the study of nano-materials, nano-devices and nano-circuits to achieve improved or previously unattainable performance specs for various electronic applications.
  • Joerg Appenzeller
  • Yong P. Chen
  • Zhihong Chen
  • Supriyo Datta
  • Tim Fisher
  • R. Edwin Garcia
  • Suresh V. Garimella
  • Jeffery L. Gray
  • David B. Janes
  • Mark Lundstrom
  • Oana Malis
  • Michael Manfra
  • Saeed Mohammadi
  • Ron Reifenberger
  • Leonid Rohkinson
  • Timothy D. Sands
  • Richard J. Schwartz
  • Alexander Wei
  • Jerry M. Woodall
  • Chen Yang
  • Piede Ye
  • Gerhard Klimeck

Nanophotonics and Optics

Image:Things_to_Do_Website.jpgOne of the most unique properties of light is that it can package information into a signal of zero mass and propagate it at the ultimate speed. It is, however, a daunting challenge to bring photonic devices to the nanometer scale because of the fundamental diffraction limit. Metamaterials can focus light down to the nanoscale and thus enable a family of new nanophotonic devices. Metamaterials, i.e. artificial materials with rationally designed geometry, composition, and arrangement of nanostructured building blocks are opening a gateway to unprecedented electromagnetic properties and functionalities that are unattainable with naturally occurring materials. The innovative field of transformation optics, which is enabled by metamaterials, inspires researchers to take a fresh look at the very foundations of optics and create a new paradigm for the science of light. Similar to general relativity, where time and space are curved, transformation optics shows that the space for light can also be bent in an almost arbitrary way. Most importantly, the optical space can be designed and engineered, opening the fascinating possibility of controlling light flow with nanometer spatial precision.
  • Alexandra Boltasseva
  • Yong P. Chen
  • Jong Hyun Choi
  • Joseph Irudayaraj
  • Sabre Kais
  • Oana Malis
  • Evgenii Narimanov
  • Minghao Qi
  • Xiulin Ruan
  • Vladimir M. Shalaev
  • Xianfan Xu
  • Alexander Wei
  • Chen Yang

Bionanotechnology and Nanomedicine

Image:Things_to_Do_Website.jpgThe direct result of interdisciplinary research is the creation of new disciplines. Researchers at the Birck Nanotechnology center are leading on the cutting edge of research that is pioneering the new foundations of nanobiotechnology. At the juncture of the new century fundamental biosciences are providing the framework for technology and engineering at the nanoscale. This has the potential to play a role in solving many of the grand challenges that we face in food security, environmental solvency, and meeting future energy needs. In particular there are significant advances in nanomedicine that will improve the quality of life, as well as to provide an engine for future economic development. Our work in this field includes new nanomaterial therapy technologies for cancer, advanced approaches for nanoscale drug delivery, nanobiosensors for diabetes, and advanced nanodevices for diagnosis and detection of pathogens and disease for personalized medicine.
  • Muhammad A. Alam
  • Donald E. Bergstrom
  • Timothy Fisher
  • Joseph Irudayaraj
  • Albena Ivanisevic
  • Chang H. Kim
  • Michael Ladisch
  • James F. Leary
  • Helen A. McNally
  • D. Marshall Porterfield
  • Arvind Raman
  • Ron Reifenberger
  • Jenna Rickus
  • Cagri Savran
  • Lia A. Stanciu
  • David H. Thompson
  • Steven Wereley
  • Peide Ye
  • Babak Ziaie

Energy Conversion & Heat Transfer

Image:Things_to_Do_Website.jpgBNC researchers seek to understand and exploit micro- and nanoscale phenomena in active devices and passive components that transfer heat or convert energy from one form to another. These endeavors promise to yield more efficient and higher performance electronics, light emitting diodes for solid-state lighting, solar cells utilizing readily available, low toxicity elements without compromising efficiency, compact and environmentally friendly solid-state refrigeration, and solid-state generators that convert a heat flux directly to electric power. Progress in these applications demands an understanding of the coupling between phonons, electrons and photons at length scales comparable to their wavelengths and scattering lengths, and at timescales ranging from femtoseconds to microseconds.
  • Yong P. Chen
  • Jong Hyun Choi
  • Supriyo Datta
  • Tim Fisher
  • Edwin Garcia
  • Suresh V. Garimella
  • Jeffery L. Gray
  • Mark Lundstrom
  • Jayathi Murthy
  • Xiulin Ruan
  • Timothy D. Sands
  • Jerry M. Woodall
  • Xianfan Xu