source: trunk/python/README @ 829

Last change on this file since 829 was 115, checked in by mmc, 16 years ago

Updated all copyright notices.

File size: 3.5 KB
Line 
1------------------------------------------------------------------------
2 Rappture - Rapid APPlication infrastrucTURE
3------------------------------------------------------------------------
4 The Rappture toolkit provides the basic building blocks for many
5 scientific applications.  These blocks can be composed using C++, or
6 a high-level language, such as Python.  Having a set of blocks for
7 basic I/O, meshing, and numerical methods, a scientist can then
8 focus on developing his core algorithm.
9------------------------------------------------------------------------
10 AUTHORS:
11   Michael J. McLennan, Purdue University
12   Copyright (c) 2004-2005  Purdue Research Foundation
13
14 See the file "license.terms" for information on usage and
15 redistribution of this file, and for a DISCLAIMER OF ALL WARRANTIES.
16------------------------------------------------------------------------
17
18
19 INSTALLATION
20------------------------------------------------------------------------
21 This part of the Rappture toolkit works with Python.  If you need to
22 install Python on your system, visit the Download section of the site
23 http://www.python.org.
24
25 Assuming you already have Python installed, you can install Rappture
26 as follows:
27
28   % cd rappture/python
29   % python setup.py install
30
31 This will make Rappture a part of your normal Python installation, so
32 you can use it in your own Python scripts, as shown below.
33
34
35 GETTING STARTED
36------------------------------------------------------------------------
37 Here is a quick tutorial to get you started using Rappture in your
38 Python scripts.
39
40 Rappture applications load their data from a library object.  You can
41 load a library as follows:
42
43   import Rappture
44   lib = Rappture.library('example.xml')
45   print lib.xml()
46 
47 The "import" statement loads the Rappture toolkit into your Python
48 application.  The next line creates a library object representing
49 the data in the "example.xml" file.  The last line prints the
50 contents of the XML library to the screen.
51
52 You can access values within the XML by using the get() method.
53 For example,
54
55   import Rappture
56   lib = Rappture.library('example.xml')
57   tval = lib.get('group(ambient).number(temp).current')
58
59 The get() method follows a path through the XML.  In this example,
60 it looks for a <group id="ambient"> tag, and then finds the
61 <number id="temp"> tag within it, then finds the <current> tag
62 within it, and then returns the text between that and the closing
63 </current> tag.
64
65 You can also add new data to the XML by using the put() method.
66 For example, we could change the temperature value that we queried
67 above as follows:
68
69   tval += 10
70   lib.put('group(ambient).number(temp).current',str(tval))
71
72 This changes the text within the <current>...</current> tag,
73 replacing it with the new value.  Note that the value must be a
74 string, so we use str(tval), rather than tval itself, when inserting
75 a value.
76
77 You can also append to an existing value.  For example,
78
79   lib.put('group(ambient).number(temp).current', 'more text', append=1)
80
81 This adds the string 'more text' after the value (tval) within the
82 <current>...</current> tag.
83
84 Suppose we wanted to add another number to the "ambient" group.
85 We could do that by requesting "number#".  The # sign indicates
86 that you'd like to create a new number element (number1, number2,
87 etc.).  For example, we could add a number for a damping factor:
88
89   lib.put('group(ambient).number#(damping).current','0.25')
90
91 This creates a new element <number id="damping"> within
92 <group id="ambient">, positioned just after the existing
93 <number id="temp">.
Note: See TracBrowser for help on using the repository browser.