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  • Organization
    Purdue University

  • Employment Type
    University / College Faculty

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  • Biography

    Ron Reifenberger is currently a professor of Physics at Purdue University and a member of Purdue’s Center for Sensing Science and Technology. He received his undergraduate degree in Physics from John Carroll University in 1970 and his PhD in Physics from the University of Chicago in 1976. He joined the Physics faculty at Purdue in 1978 following a two-year post-doctoral appointment in the Physics Department at the University of Toronto. Upon joining the faculty at Purdue, Reifenberger initiated a program to measure photo-induced field emitted electrons from a variety of metals. Since 1986, Reifenberger’s scanning probe group has been active in furthering inter-disciplinary nanoscale research at Purdue by establishing collaborations with faculty throughout campus. His group has focused on research problems that emphasize the role of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) as one of the key enablers of nanotechnology. His current research is focused on non-linear dynamics of SPM cantilevers, micro patterning of substrates for the rapid detection of targeted bacteria, and fundamental measurements related to current flow in molecules, carbon nanotubes and Au nanocluster networks. This work is currently supported by grants from ARO, NSF, DOE, NASA and NAVSEA and has resulted in ~130 refereed publications and three US patents. Reifenberger has received the Distinguished Alumni Award from John Carroll University in 1992, is on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, and has been a Conference Co-organizer of the European Trends in Nanotechnology 2001 and Trends in Nanotechnology 2002 Conferences. He recently participated in the international APEC Foresight Committee entitled Nanotechnology, The Technology for the 21st Century.


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