Support

Support Options

Submit a Support Ticket

 

[Illinois] CNST 2012: Panel Discussion

By Beniamino Barbieri1, Anthony Leggett2, Tayo Akinwande3, Piotr Grodzinski4, Lloyd Whitman5

1. ISS 2. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 3. DARPA 4. National Cancer Institute 5. NIST

NCN@Illinois Video Team

NCN@Illinois Video Team group image

Published on

Abstract

CNST Workshop 2012

May 2–3, 2012

Showcasing University of Illinois research in bionanotechnology/nanomedicine, nanoelectronics/nanophotonics, and nanomaterials/nanomanufacturing, leading to cross-campus and industry collaborations National Center for Supercomputing Applications Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Workshop Premise

The broad objective of the University of Illinois Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (CNST) workshop is to showcase University of Illinois research in bionanotechnology/ nanomedicine, nanoelectronics/nanophotonics, nanomaterials/nanomanufacturing, and computational nanotechnology/nanomechanics.

The general framework of the nanotechnology workshop is similar to those held on campus since 2003; which were all well attended by industry and academia. Some of those interactions have since then led to industry and cross-campus collaborations. The CNST-led forums and workshops have contributed tremendously toward the formation of multidisciplinary teams leading to the establishment of multimillion dollar new nanotechnology centers on-campus. The workshop will provide a forum for industry interactions and collaborations. The workshop brings together campus community (faculty, graduate and undergraduates, administration) from UIUC and other academic institutions, and industry engaged in cutting-edge research. A workshop panel will discuss the roadmap to future direction of research and development in nanotechnology and regional partnerships.

Established in 2001–02, the University of Illinois Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (CNST) is the premier center for nanotechnology research, education and training, and entrepreneurial and outreach activities.

CNST draws its strength from working as a collaboratory involving the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, Roy J. Carver Biotechnology Center, Coordinated Science Laboratory,Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, Institute for Genomic Biology, Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Center for Nanoscale Chemical, Electrical, Mechanical, Manufacturing Systems, National Center for Supercomputing Applications, the Schools of Chemical Sciences and of Molecular and Cellular Biology, and other multidisciplinary centers.

It brings together nanoscale research from across the campus, drawing faculty from engineering, chemistry, physics, biology, neuroscience, agriculture, medicine, and other areas. The center envisions seamless integration of research from materials to devices to systems and applications. CNST is uniquely located to harness the entrepreneurial and technical spirit in downstate Illinois, with ongoing linkages with the University Research Park, the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, and the State legislature. Industrial and international linkages have also been initiated through multidisciplinary centers. In addition, CNST has embarked on developing a curriculum for nanotechnology education, which will transcend a number of campus departments and units. Exceptional students with interest in nanotechnology projects have been awarded fellowships, as the center prepares the next generation workforce. CNST-led efforts have led to leveraging of existing nanotechnology research labs into also hands-on training sites for molecular and cellular biology, mechanobiology, micro and nanofabrication, and enabling technologies, and tissue engineering.

The CNST thrives on its cutting-edge core research in bionanotechnology, computational nanotechnology, nanocharacterization, nanoelectromechanical systems, nanoelectronics, nanofabrication, nanomaterials, and nanophotonics. Translational areas include: nanoagriculture and food, nanoenvironment, nanomanufacturing, nanomedicine, nanosecurity, and societal implications of nanotechnology. For more information visit: nano.illinois.edu or email: nanotechnology@illinois.edu or call 217-244-1353. Workshop Sponsored by: The Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Co-sponsors: Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory National Center for Supercomputing Applications

Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology Coordinated Science Laboratory Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory Institute for Genomic Biology NSF IGERT- CMMB NIH/NCI M-CNTC NSF STC Center on Emergent Behaviors of Integrated Cellular Systems (EBICS, co-location) NSF Nano-CEMMS Network for Computational Nanotechnology/NanoHub at Illinois Nanotechnology Community of Scholars at ACES

Bio

Panelists:

Tayo Akinwande, DARPA Akintunde Ibitayo (Tayo) Akinwande is a Professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA. Professor Akinwande received a B.Sc. (1978) in Electrical and Electronic Engineering from the University of Ife, Nigeria, a MS (1981) and Ph.D. (1986) in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University, Stanford, California.

Professor Akinwande joined Honeywell Inc. in 1986 where he initially conducted research on GaAs Complementary FET technology for very high speed and low power signal processing. He later joined the Si Microstructures group where he conducted research on pressure sensors, accelerometers, thin-film field emission and display devices.

Professor Akinwande joined MIT's Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL) in January 1995 where his research focuses on micro-fabrication and electronic devices with particular emphasis on smart sensors and actuators, intelligent displays, large area electronics (macro-electronics), field emission & field ionization devices, mass spectrometry and electric propulsion.

Prof. Akinwande is a recipient of the 1996 National Science Foundation (NSF) Career Award. He has served a number of technical program committees for various conferences, including the Device Research Conference, the International Electron Devices Meeting, the International Solid-State Circuits Conference, the International Display Research Conference and the International Vacuum Microelectronics Conference. Professor Akinwande holds numerous patents in MEMS, Electronics on Flexible Substrates, Display technologies and has authored more than 100 journal publications. He was a visiting professor at the Cambridge University Engineering Department and an Overseas Fellow of Churchill College in 2002-2003. He is a current member of the IEEE Nanotechnology Council.

(Source)

Piotr Grodzinski, NCI Dr. Piotr Grodzinski is a Director of Nanotechnology for Cancer programs at NCI. He coordinates program and research activities of the Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer which has dedicated $144M over 5 years (2004–2009). These funds have supported the formation of interdisciplinary centers as well as individual research and training programs targeting nanotechnology solutions for improved prevention, detection, and treatment of cancer.

Dr. Grodzinski is a materials scientist by training, but found bio- and nanotechnology fascinating. In the mid-nineties, he left the world of semiconductor research and built a large microfluidics program at Motorola Corporate Research & Development in Arizona. The group made important contributions to the development of integrated microfluidics for genetic sample preparation with its work being featured in Chemical & Engineering News and Nature Reviews. After his tenure at Motorola, Dr. Grodzinski joined the Bioscience Division of Los Alamos National Laboratory where he served as a Group Leader and an interim Chief Scientist for the Department of Energy Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT).

Dr. Grodzinski received his Ph.D. in Materials Science from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles in 1992. He is an inventor on 15 patents and has authored over 100 technical publications and conference presentations.

Dr. Grodzinski has been an invited speaker and has served on the committees of numerous bio- and nano-Micro-Electromechanical Systems conferences.

(Source)

Lloyd Whitman, NIST Lloyd Whitman joined the Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology as the Deputy Director in April 2008. He received a B.S. in Physics from Brown University (with honors, magna cum laude), and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Physics from Cornell University. After an NRC Postdoctoral Research Fellowship at NIST, he joined the research staff at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). At NRL, Lloyd was most recently the Head of the Surface Nanoscience and Sensor Technology Section, a multidisciplinary research group working at the nexus of nanoscience, biotechnology, and microsystems. He led a diverse portfolio of research studying semiconductor, organic, and biomolecular nanostructures, their use in novel functional surfaces, and their integration into advanced sensor systems for national security applications. In addition to leading research at NRL, Lloyd served as a Science Advisor to the Special Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Chemical and Biological Defense and Chemical Demilitarization Programs. In this capacity, he represented the Department of Defense on the National Science and Technology Council, Committee on Technology Subcommittee on Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology. Lloyd has over 140 publications and patent applications in the areas of nanoscience and sensor technology, and numerous media citations and awards, including the Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Award.

(Source)

Nobel Laureate Anthony Leggett, Physics, Illinois Sir Anthony J. Leggett, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Professor and Center for Advanced Study Professor of Physics, has been a faculty member at Illinois since 1983. He is widely recognized as a world leader in the theory of low-temperature physics, and his pioneering work on superfluidity was recognized by the 2003 Nobel Prize in Physics. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Russian Academy of Sciences (foreign member), and is a Fellow of the Royal Society (U.K.), the American Physical Society, and the American Institute of Physics. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Institute of Physics (U.K.). He was knighted (KBE) by Queen Elizabeth II in 2004 "for services to physics."

Professor Leggett has shaped the theoretical understanding of normal and superfluid helium liquids and other strongly coupled superfluids. He set directions for research in the quantum physics of macroscopic dissipative systems and use of condensed systems to test the foundations of quantum mechanics. His research interests lie mainly within the fields of theoretical condensed matter physics and the foundations of quantum mechanics. He has been particularly interested in the possibility of using special condensed-matter systems, such as Josephson devices, to test the validity of the extrapolation of the quantum formalism to the macroscopic level; this interest has led to a considerable amount of technical work on the application of quantum mechanics to collective variables and in particular on ways of incorporating dissipation into the calculations. He is also interested in the theory of superfluid liquid 3He, especially under extreme nonequilibrium conditions, in high-temperature superconductivity, and in the newly realized system of Bose-condensed atomic gases.

(Source)

Beniamino Barbieri, ISS, Inc. Beniamino Barbieri is the president of ISS, Inc. Since 1984, ISS has been committed to the development and design of highly sensitive scientific instrumentation for research, clinical and industrial applications. Over the years, our innovations introduced to research-grade fluorescence instrumentation generated a second product line for medical applications. In 1992, ISS started a project with the research group at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign headed by Prof. Enrico Gratton and aimed at understanding the behavior of fluorophores in scattering and turbid media; the goal was the development of an instrument suitable for the non-invasive measurements of metabolites in the human body. As a result of this collaboration, ISS introduced a non-invasive Tissue Oximeter for the measurement of the absolute oxygen concentration in tissues, called OxiplexTS. The first prototype of the instrument was completed in 1998; about one hundred units of OxiplexTS have been installed worldwide so far. A second instrument, Imagent, utilized for the mapping of activated brain areas, was added in 2001. Both products have been developed with the generous contribution of The National Institutes of Health through the SBIR program and today they are successfully marketed worldwide by our division ISS Medical, fully dedicated to the development of instrumentation for medical applications.ISS instruments are installed in universities and corporations worldwide. Our customers include several major universities, corporations, hospitals and research institutions across the globe, including, in the United States, The Mayo Foundation, the VA Administration, The National Institute of Standards and Technology, The National Institutes of Health, Oak Ridge National Laboratories and The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

(Source)

Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Beniamino Barbieri; Anthony Leggett; Tayo Akinwande; Piotr Grodzinski; Lloyd Whitman (2013), "[Illinois] CNST 2012: Panel Discussion," https://nanohub.org/resources/14034.

    BibTex | EndNote

Time

Location

NCSA Auditorium, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL

Submitter

Charlie Newman, NanoBio Node

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Tags

nanoHUB.org, a resource for nanoscience and nanotechnology, is supported by the National Science Foundation and other funding agencies. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.