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Ultrafast & Broadband Photonic Signal Processing: From Microdevices to Control of RF Propagation

By Andrew M Weiner

Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

Published on

Abstract

This talk is part of the International Workshop “Novel Ideas in Optics: From Advanced Materials to Revolutionary Applications” hosted by Purdue University.

Bio

Andrew M Weiner

Andrew M. Weiner graduated from M.I.T. in 1984 with an Sc.D. in electrical engineering. Upon graduation he joined Bellcore, first as Member of Technical Staff and later as Manager of Ultrafast Optics and Optical Signal Processing Research. Prof. Weiner moved to Purdue University in 1992 and is currently the Scifres Family Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. His research focuses on ultrafast optics signal processing and applications to high-speed optical communications and ultrawideband wireless. He is especially well known for his pioneering work on programmable femtosecond pulse shaping using liquid crystal modulator arrays.

Prof. Weiner is author of a textbook entitled Ultrafast Optics (Wiley, 2009), has published six book chapters and approximately 250 journal articles, and is inventor of 13 U.S. patents. Prof. Weiner is a Fellow both of the Optical Society of America and of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering. He has won numerous awards for his research, including the Hertz Foundation Doctoral Thesis Prize (1984), the Adolph Lomb Medal of the Optical Society of America (1990), the Curtis McGraw Research Award of the American Society of Engineering Education (1997), the International Commission on Optics Prize (1997), the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Research Award for Senior U.S. Scientists (2000), and the IEEE Photonics Society Quantum Electronics Award (2011). He is joint recipient, with J.P. Heritage, of the IEEE LEOS William Streifer Scientific Achievement Award (1999) and the OSA R.W. Wood Prize (2008) and has been recognized by Purdue University with the inaugural Research Excellence Award from the Schools of Engineering (2003) and with the Provost’s Outstanding Graduate Student Mentor Award (2008). In 2009 Prof. Weiner was named a U.S. Dept. of Defense National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellow. Additionally, a number of Prof. Weiner’s 27 graduated Ph.D. students have been selected for graduate student awards & fellowships from the IEEE Photonics Society and Optical Society of America.

Prof. Weiner has served as Co-Chair of the Conference on Lasers and Electro-optics and the International Conference on Ultrafast Phenomena, as Secretary/Treasurer of the IEEE Lasers and Electro-optics Society (LEOS), and as a Vice-President of the International Commission on Optics (ICO). He has also served as Associate or Topical Editor for Optics Letters, IEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics, and IEEE Photonics Technology Letters. Prof. Weiner is currently serving as Chair of the National Academy of Engineering’s U.S. Frontiers of Engineering Meeting.

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Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Andrew M Weiner (2013), "Ultrafast & Broadband Photonic Signal Processing: From Microdevices to Control of RF Propagation," https://nanohub.org/resources/16459.

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Time

Location

Burton Morgan 121, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

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