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Abstract

           In this lecture, we continued the SPR Sensors discussion. We started off with the coupling condition being determined by the refractive index. This means that light now goes through a protein. In the experimental results, it shows a shift from lower angle to a higher angle that resulted in the coupling condition. Then we looked at three different methods to use the Kretschmann Geometry to look at measuring SPR. The first method was to use a lens to measure all of the angles, the second was to use white light to represent all of the wavelengths, and the last method was to use a laser and look at the intensity of the reflection through a photodiode. The results of the biosensor are then presented on a graph called a "sensorgram". We then looked at the different assay methods, including direct binding assay and inhibition assay. Last, we discussed the disadvantages of the Kretschmann Geometry. We could only measure a handful of independent sensor location and we index matching coupling fluid to interface sensor chip to prism.

Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Brian Cunningham (2013), "[Illinois] ECE 416 SPR Sensors III," https://nanohub.org/resources/17050.

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Time

Location

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL

Submitter

NanoBio Node, Obaid Sarvana, George Daley

Tags

[Illinois] ECE 416 Lecture 17: SPR Sensors III
  • Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensors 1. Surface Plasmon Resonance Bios… 0
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  • Dielectric Permittivity 2. Dielectric Permittivity 50.5637278081073
    00:00/00:00
  • Coulomb's Law Force between two charges 3. Coulomb's Law Force between tw… 97.93472652218783
    00:00/00:00
  • Electric Field Due to a Point Charge 4. Electric Field Due to a Point … 143.67892156862746
    00:00/00:00
  • Polarization of a molecule 5. Polarization of a molecule 172.19156346749227
    00:00/00:00
  • Polarization of a molecule 6. Polarization of a molecule 174.29901960784315
    00:00/00:00
  • 7. "mini" dipole moment for one m… 274.21723426212588
    00:00/00:00
  • neutral 8. neutral 399.17698658410734
    00:00/00:00
  • Apply E to a group of molecules 9. Apply E to a group of molecule… 420.49948400412796
    00:00/00:00
  • Apply E to a group of molecules Cancellation of internal charges 10. Apply E to a group of molecule… 826.99058307533539
    00:00/00:00
  • Apply E to group of molecules Cancellation of internal charges 11. Apply E to group of molecules … 986.28947368421052
    00:00/00:00
  • Dielectric Permittivity 12. Dielectric Permittivity 1113.6046181630547
    00:00/00:00
  • To summarize 13. To summarize 1276.4985810113519
    00:00/00:00
  • Refractive Index 14. Refractive Index 1277.9861971104231
    00:00/00:00
  • Water Molecule: H2O Oxygen atom 15. Water Molecule: H2O Oxygen ato… 2003.5709494324046
    00:00/00:00
  • An electric field gives a force to all the electrons in a molecule + + 16. An electric field gives a forc… 2228.6968524251806
    00:00/00:00
  • 17. "Waving" Electric Field from L… 2311.8793859649122
    00:00/00:00
  • Waving Electric Field Effect on Electrons in a Molecule 18. Waving Electric Field Effect o… 2315.1025541795666
    00:00/00:00
  • What is protein? 19. What is protein? 2332.5820433436534
    00:00/00:00
  • Protein size compared to a visible wavelength 20. Protein size compared to a vis… 2369.1526057791539
    00:00/00:00
  • Detecting Molecules by Dielectric Permittivity 21. Detecting Molecules by Dielect… 2592.0470846233229
    00:00/00:00
  • What optical biosensors need 22. What optical biosensors need 2776.6354489164087
    00:00/00:00