[Illinois] ECE 416 Optical Sensors II

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Abstract

           In this lecture, there is a review of the previous lecture of SPR Sensors along with Reflection Interference Spectroscopy. We learned that as we go to longer wavelengths, the refractive index is more constant. Then, we looked at the data of an RIFS and how to interpret it. The advantages of the system is that it is simple to make and makes non-contact measurements. However, the disadvantages include a low throughput, which means we receive around one result at a time.The system also has a very low sensitivity. Then, we looked at optical resonators, which are like guided light waves. We can put biomolecules along a ring and have the light waves detect them through varying intensities.

Bio

My research group is focused on the application of sub-wavelength optical phenomena and fabrication methods to the development of novel devices and instrumentation for the life sciences. The group is highly interdisciplinary, with expertise in the areas of microfabrication, nanotechnology, computer simulation, instrumentation, molecular biology, and cell biology. In particular, we are working on biosensors based upon photonic crystal concepts that can either be built from low-cost flexible plastic materials, or integrated with semiconductor-based active devices, such as light sources and photodetectors, for high performance integrated detection systems.

Using a combination of micrometer-scale and nanometer-scale fabrication tools, we are devising novel methods and materials for producing electro-optic devices with nanometer-scale features that can be scaled for low-cost manufacturing. Many of our techniques are geared for compatibility with flexible plastic materials, leading to applications such as low cost disposable sensors, wearable sensors, flexible electronics, and flexible displays. Because our structures manipulate light at a scale that is smaller than an optical wavelength, we rely on computer simulation tools such as Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) and Finite Difference Time Doman (FDTD) to model, design, and understand optical phenomena within photonic crystals and related devices.

In addition to fabricating devices, our group is also focused on the design, prototyping, and testing of biosensor instrumentation for high sensitivity, portability, and resolution. Advanced instruments enable high resolution imaging of biochemical and cellular interactions with the ability to monitor images of biochemical interactions as a function of time. Using the sensors and instrumentation, we are exploring new applications for optical biosensor technology including protein microarrays, biosensor/mass spectrometry systems, and microfluidics-based assays using nanoliter quantities of reagents. The methods and systems developed in the laboratory are applied in the fields of life science research, drug discovery, diagnostic testing, and environmental monitoring. -From Professor Cunningham's Faculty Profile

Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Brian Cunningham (2013), "[Illinois] ECE 416 Optical Sensors II," https://nanohub.org/resources/17350.

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Time

Location

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL

Submitter

NanoBio Node, Obaid Sarvana, George Daley

Tags

[Illinois] ECE 416 Lecture 19: Optical Sensors II
  • Reflection Interference Spectroscopy (RIFS) 1. Reflection Interference Spectr… 0
    00:00/00:00
  • RIFS 2. RIFS 651.07794715864736
    00:00/00:00
  • RIFS 3. RIFS 831.94670666064007
    00:00/00:00
  • RIFS Data (Piehler Paper) 4. RIFS Data (Piehler Paper) 1091.1630028351892
    00:00/00:00
  • Discussion - RIFS Advantages & Limitations 5. Discussion - RIFS Advantages &… 1983.3579734560547
    00:00/00:00
  • Interferometer Biosensors 6. Interferometer Biosensors 2262.6570242840121
    00:00/00:00
  • Optical Waveguide Total Internal Reflection (TIR) 7. Optical Waveguide Total Intern… 2263.0289271479637
    00:00/00:00
  • Optical Waveguide 8. Optical Waveguide 2265.1363767103589
    00:00/00:00
  • Optical Waveguide 9. Optical Waveguide 2265.6322471956282
    00:00/00:00
  • Mode Profile in a Waveguide Waveguide layer 10. Mode Profile in a Waveguide Wa… 2266.3760529235319
    00:00/00:00
  • Discussion 11. Discussion 2267.6157291367053
    00:00/00:00
  • Effective Index (neff) 12. Effective Index (neff) 2268.7314377285616
    00:00/00:00
  • Waveguide 13. Waveguide 2269.5992110777829
    00:00/00:00
  • Mach-Zender Interferometer 14. Mach-Zender Interferometer 2270.3430168056866
    00:00/00:00
  • MZ Interferometer 15. MZ Interferometer 2271.2107901549084
    00:00/00:00
  • MZ Interferometer 16. MZ Interferometer 2272.3264987467642
    00:00/00:00
  • Discussion - MZ Interferometer Advantages Disadvantages 17. Discussion - MZ Interferometer… 2273.1942720959855
    00:00/00:00
  • What is an optical resonator? 18. What is an optical resonator? 2273.814110202572
    00:00/00:00
  • Acoustic Resonator 19. Acoustic Resonator 2381.5419731273369
    00:00/00:00
  • The Simplest Optical Resonator: Two Mirrors 20. The Simplest Optical Resonator… 2382.1618112339238
    00:00/00:00
  • The Simplest Optical Resonator: Two Mirrors 21. The Simplest Optical Resonator… 2385.6329046308092
    00:00/00:00
  • The Simplest Optical Resonator 22. The Simplest Optical Resonator 2387.9882894358384
    00:00/00:00
  • Optical Resonator Biosensor Biomolecules 23. Optical Resonator Biosensor Bi… 2388.8560627850597
    00:00/00:00
  • Desired Optical Properties 24. Desired Optical Properties 2389.7238361342811
    00:00/00:00
  • Example Optical Resonators 25. Example Optical Resonators 2390.2197066195504
    00:00/00:00
  • Enhanced E Fields: Optical Resonators 26. Enhanced E Fields: Optical Res… 2963.9418580761803
    00:00/00:00