[Illinois] ECE 416 Lumerical Optical Simulation

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Abstract

           In this lecture, we looked at lumerical optical simulation. The motivation to pursue this topic is because there is now software available that allows us to conduct simulations to visualize Electromagnetic field locations, to predict sensitivity, and optimize the device design. The software most widely used for modeling low light interactions is Finite Difference Time Domain(FDTD). The pros and options of the software are then shown and discussed. The Finite Difference part breaks up the object we are observing and the space surrounding into thousands of cells. This is then used to put a simulation where if we know the Electromagnetic field entering the cell, the Electromagnetic field leaving the cell can be determined. The Time Domain aspect provides the simulation space with short electromagnetic pulses. These are tracked through cells of the simulation space and the program offers another option for wavelengths and illumination sources. The yee cell is a part of the FDTD software and if the electromagnetic field components for the future need to be determined, the past electromagnetic field components need to be known. The size of choice of these cells is critical and directly affected by the material present, but once the size is selected, the time step is determined. In the time steps, the waves are dictated by the speed of light and the wave shouldn't pass through more than one cell at a time. Methods of outputting the data are then seen.

Bio

My research group is focused on the application of sub-wavelength optical phenomena and fabrication methods to the development of novel devices and instrumentation for the life sciences. The group is highly interdisciplinary, with expertise in the areas of microfabrication, nanotechnology, computer simulation, instrumentation, molecular biology, and cell biology. In particular, we are working on biosensors based upon photonic crystal concepts that can either be built from low-cost flexible plastic materials, or integrated with semiconductor-based active devices, such as light sources and photodetectors, for high performance integrated detection systems.

Using a combination of micrometer-scale and nanometer-scale fabrication tools, we are devising novel methods and materials for producing electro-optic devices with nanometer-scale features that can be scaled for low-cost manufacturing. Many of our techniques are geared for compatibility with flexible plastic materials, leading to applications such as low cost disposable sensors, wearable sensors, flexible electronics, and flexible displays. Because our structures manipulate light at a scale that is smaller than an optical wavelength, we rely on computer simulation tools such as Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) and Finite Difference Time Doman (FDTD) to model, design, and understand optical phenomena within photonic crystals and related devices.

In addition to fabricating devices, our group is also focused on the design, prototyping, and testing of biosensor instrumentation for high sensitivity, portability, and resolution. Advanced instruments enable high resolution imaging of biochemical and cellular interactions with the ability to monitor images of biochemical interactions as a function of time. Using the sensors and instrumentation, we are exploring new applications for optical biosensor technology including protein microarrays, biosensor/mass spectrometry systems, and microfluidics-based assays using nanoliter quantities of reagents. The methods and systems developed in the laboratory are applied in the fields of life science research, drug discovery, diagnostic testing, and environmental monitoring. -From Professor Cunningham's Faculty Profile

Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Brian Cunningham (2013), "[Illinois] ECE 416 Lumerical Optical Simulation," https://nanohub.org/resources/17357.

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[Illinois] ECE 416 Lecture 23: Lumerical Optical Simulation
  • Introduction to Lumerical Optical Simulation 1. Introduction to Lumerical Opti… 0
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  • Outline 2. Outline 138.30323236430169
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  • Motivation 3. Motivation 168.47244478789605
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  • Example: Microring biosensors 4. Example: Microring biosensors 226.04210526315791
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  • Example: Nano Crescent Particles 5. Example: Nano Crescent Particl… 436.8
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  • Motivation 6. Motivation 779.30526315789473
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  • Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method for electromagnetics 7. Finite Difference Time Domain … 867.978947368421
    00:00/00:00
  • FDTD is very powerful 8. FDTD is very powerful 945.72631578947369
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  • Examples 9. Examples 1039.2631578947369
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  • What is FDTD? 10. What is FDTD? 1251.4105263157896
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  • What is FDTD? 11. What is FDTD? 1495.6421052631579
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  • Yee Cell 12. Yee Cell 1610.0842105263157
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  • Yee Cell 13. Yee Cell 2486.9796300060989
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  • Size of a Yee Cell 14. Size of a Yee Cell 2489.0285110017489
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  • Size of a time step 15. Size of a time step 2529.442062878757
    00:00/00:00
  • Fourier Tranform to get Spectrum 16. Fourier Tranform to get Spectr… 2569.4837109041364
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  • Update Order 17. Update Order 2608.5336153251719
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  • Update Order 18. Update Order 2685.39374466181
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  • Basic FDTD Flow Chart 19. Basic FDTD Flow Chart 2689.1127831781023
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  • Lumerical FDTD Solutions 20. Lumerical FDTD Solutions 2867.6266319599786
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  • First Lumerical Homework Assignment 21. First Lumerical Homework Assig… 2922.1725301988859
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