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[Illinois] GEM4 2012: Applications to Tissue Engineering

By Linda Griffith

Biological Engineering and Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

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Abstract


Cellular and Molecular Mechanics with a focus on Developmental Biology The 2012 GEM4 Summer School program consists of lectures in the mornings by experts in cellular and molecular mechanics and developmental biology, and hands-on labs in the afternoons on various experimental techniques in biology and engineering. The objectives of the GEM4 Summer School are to educate researchers and graduate students about the fundamentals of cell and molecular biomechanics, and to provide an intense learning experience, and to facilitate interactions among engineers, biologists and clinicians. The goals are to help train a new generation of researchers with in-depth knowledge of mechanics and biology and to help engineers and biologists apply biomechanical approaches in biomolecular, cellular, tissue-level, animal model studies.

Bio

LINDA G. GRIFFITH, PH.D.

Professor of Biological Engineering and Mechanical Engineering

Director, Center for Gynepathology Research

Her research can be categorized within the rapidly-emerging field of bioengineering termed "tissue engineering". This field can be defined as the manipulation of cells using biochemical factors, synthetic materials, and mechanics, to form multi-dimensional structures that carry out the functions of normal tissue in vitro or in vivo. Her work focuses on controlling the spatial and temporal presentation of molecular ligands and physical cues which are known to influence cell behavior. Current projects include: (1) synthesis of new materials that control cells from the solid phase at a microscopic level and synthesis of new three-dimensional architectures that guide tissue morphogenesis at a macroscopic level; (2) determination of cell/matrix organizational principles to provide a basis for future developments in synthesis.

Sponsored by

MIT, NSF, GEM4, MechSE

Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Linda Griffith (2013), "[Illinois] GEM4 2012: Applications to Tissue Engineering ," https://nanohub.org/resources/18058.

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Location

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

Submitter

NanoBio Node, AbderRahman N Sobh

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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