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[Illinois] Multi-function Semiconductor Membranes with Nanopore for Bio-Molecule Sensing and Manipulation

By Jean-Pierre Leburton1, Anuj Gridhar1

1. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Published on

Abstract

In the recent years there has been a tremendous interest in using solid-state membranes with nanopores as a new tool for DNA and RNA characterization and possible sequencing. Among solid-state nanoporous membranes the use of mono-layer graphene is particularly attractive because of its electric versatility, physical robustness, and good electronic properties. In this talk I will review progresses made with semiconducting membranes for manipulating and sensing bio-molecules. In this context, I will present a scenario that integrates biology with graphene-based nano-electronics for probing the electrical activity of DNA molecules during their translocation through a graphene membrane nanopore, thereby providing a means to manipulate them, and possibly identify electronically their molecular sequences.

Bio

 
leburton

Jean-Pierre Leburton (UIUC) is the G. Stillman Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Professor of Physics at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign. He is also a full time Research Faculty in the Beckman Institute. He received his License (Bs) and PhD in solid state physics from the University of Liege, Belgium in 1978. Dr. Leburton joined the University of Illinois in 1981 from Germany, where he worked as a research scientist with the Siemens A.G. Research Laboratory in Munich. He is involved with research in nanostructures modeling and in quantum device simulation. His present research interest encompasses non-linear transport in quantum wires, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and molecular and ionic transport through semiconducting nanopores for biomolecule manipulation and sensing.

Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Jean-Pierre Leburton; Anuj Gridhar (2013), "[Illinois] Multi-function Semiconductor Membranes with Nanopore for Bio-Molecule Sensing and Manipulation," https://nanohub.org/resources/19498.

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NanoBio Node

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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