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Thinking Small

By Carl Batt1, NCLT administator2

1. Cornell University 2. Northwestern University

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    Tanya Faltens

    4.0 out of 5 stars

    This talk discusses: – The funding behind nanotechnology research and outreach – Results of a study to find out what the general public knows about nanotechnology – What framework people use for thinking about things that are too small to see – How NCLT developed strategies for communication with the general public about nanotechnology – 4 basic concepts in nano: 1) All things are make of atoms. 2) Molecules have size and shape 3) At the nanometer scale, atoms are in constant motion. 4) Molecules in their nanometer scale environment have unexpected properties. – the Too Small to See traveling museum exhibit – the Nanooze magazine I found this quite an interesting presentation, and people interested in nanoscience outreach and education should get something from this, too. If you are looking for more details about the science of nanoscience, then this may not be what you are looking for.

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    Anonymous

    5.0 out of 5 stars

    This is an awesome talk. I just want to where is those data come from (ask people have you heard about “nano” “nanotechnology”, what is the smallest thing you can see and think of)? If I want to cite those data, how could I properly cite them? In which year exactly the survey was conducted ?

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    1. Xin (Cindy) Chen

      I think I just found the paper about the data. If anybody interested, here is the citation information: Waldron, A. M., Spencer, D., & Batt, C. A. (2006). The current state of public understanding of nanotechnology. Journal of Nanoparticle Research, 8(5), 569-575. doi:10.1007/s11051-006-9112-7

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