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Analytic Spin Precession Simulator

By Jing Xu

University of Delaware

Simulate spin precession effect in pure silicon

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Archive Version 1.1
Published on 05 May 2010
Latest version: 1.101. All versions

doi:10.4231/D3FF3M026 cite this

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Abstract

Spin precession and dephasing (Hanle effect) provides an umbiguous means to establish the presence of spin transport in semiconductors. Analytic spin precession simulator simulates Hanle effect in linear band pure silicon spin transport device with the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field.

Spin diffusion-drift equation is used to provide an analytical transit time distribution of electrons. Final signal received at detector side is plotted as a function of perpendicular magnetic field intensity. Use this tool to understand the effects of oblique magnetization, injector/detector magnetization flipping and tilting on spin precession.

Credits

Analytic spin precession simulator has been developed by Appelbaum Lab at University of Delaware, Newark, DE.

Sponsored by

DARPA/MTO and ONR.

References

Ian Appelbaum, Biqin Huang, and Douwe J. Monsma, "Electronic measurement and control of spin transport in silicon", Nature 447, 295 (2007).

Jing Li, Biqin Huang, and Ian Appelbaum, "Oblique Hanle Effect in Semiconductor Spin Transport Devices", Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 142507 (2008).

Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Jing Xu (2014), "Analytic Spin Precession Simulator," https://nanohub.org/resources/spinprecession. (DOI: 10.4231/D3FF3M026).

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