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Tags: circuits

Description

In 1973, SPICE was introduced to the world by Professor Donald O. Pederson of the University of California at Berkeley, and a new era of computer-aided design (CAD) tools was born. As its name implies, SPICE is a "Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis." You give it a description of an electrical circuit, made up of resistors, capacitors, inductors, and power sources, and SPICE will predict the performance of that circuit. Instead of bread-boarding new designs in the lab, circuit designers found they could optimize their designs on computers–in effect, using computers to build better computers. Since its introduction, SPICE has been commercialized and released in a dozen variants, such as H-SPICE, P-SPICE, and ADVICE.

Learn more about circuit simulation from the resources on this site, listed below. You might even acquire a taste for SPICE by running examples online.

Online Presentations (21-39 of 39)

  1. ECE 612 Lecture 2: Introduction to Device Simulation

    08 Aug 2006 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Mark Lundstrom

    https://nanohub.org/resources/1699

  2. Nanotubes and Nanowires: One-dimensional Materials

    17 Jul 2006 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Timothy D. Sands

    What is a nanowire? What is a nanotube? Why are they interesting and what are their potential applications? How are they made? This presentation is intended to begin to answer these questions...

    https://nanohub.org/resources/1639

  3. History of Semiconductor Engineering

    28 Jun 2006 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Bo Lojek

    When basic researchers started working on semiconductors during the late nineteen thirties and on integrated circuits at the end of the nineteen fifties, they did not know that their work would...

    https://nanohub.org/resources/1609

  4. Logic Devices and Circuits on Carbon Nanotubes

    05 Apr 2006 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Joerg Appenzeller

    Over the last years carbon nanotubes (CNs) have attracted an increasing interest as building blocks for nano-electronics applications. Due to their unique properties enabling e.g. ballistic...

    https://nanohub.org/resources/1487

  5. Switching Energy in CMOS Logic: How far are we from physical limit?

    24 Apr 2006 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Saibal Mukhopadhyay

    Aggressive scaling of CMOS devices in technology generation has resulted in exponential growth in device performance, integration density and computing power. However, the power dissipated by a...

    https://nanohub.org/resources/1250

  6. Thermal Microsystems for On-Chip Thermal Engineering

    04 Apr 2006 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Suresh V. Garimella

    Electro-thermal co-design at the micro- and nano-scales is critical for achieving desired performance and reliability in microelectronic circuits. Emerging thermal microsystems technologies...

    https://nanohub.org/resources/1182

  7. Molecular Transport Structures: Elastic Scattering, Vibronic Effects and Beyond

    13 Feb 2006 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Mark A. Ratner, Abraham Nitzan, Misha Galperin

    Current experimental efforts are clarifying quite beautifully the nature of charge transport in so-called molecular junctions, in which a single molecule provides the channel for current flow...

    https://nanohub.org/resources/1018

  8. A Primer on Semiconductor Device Simulation

    23 Jan 2006 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Mark Lundstrom

    Computer simulation is now an essential tool for the research and development of semiconductor processes and devices, but to use a simulation tool intelligently, one must know what's "under the...

    https://nanohub.org/resources/980

  9. Atomic Force Microscopy

    01 Dec 2005 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Arvind Raman

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is an indispensible tool in nano science for the fabrication, metrology, manipulation, and property characterization of nanostructures. This tutorial reviews some of...

    https://nanohub.org/resources/520

  10. An Electrical Engineering Perspective on Molecular Electronics

    26 Oct 2005 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Mark Lundstrom

    After forty years of advances in integrated circuit technology, microelectronics is undergoing a transformation to nanoelectronics. Modern day MOSFETs now have channel lengths that are less than...

    https://nanohub.org/resources/513

  11. Wireless Integrated MicroSystems (WIMS): Coming Revolution in the Gathering of Information

    01 Sep 2005 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Kensall D. Wise

    Wireless integrated microsystems promise to become pervasive during the coming decade in applications ranging from health care and environmental monitoring to homeland security. Merging low-power...

    https://nanohub.org/resources/190

  12. Plasmonic Nanophotonics: Coupling Light to Nanostructure via Plasmons

    03 Oct 2005 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Vladimir M. Shalaev

    The photon is the ultimate unit of information because it packages data in a signal of zero mass and has unmatched speed. The power of light is driving the photonicrevolution, and information...

    https://nanohub.org/resources/194

  13. On the Reliability of Micro-Electronic Devices: An Introductory Lecture on Negative Bias Temperature Instability

    28 Sep 2005 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Muhammad A. Alam

    In 1930s Bell Labs scientists chose to focus on Siand Ge, rather than better known semiconductors like Ag2S and Cu2S, mostly because of their reliable performance. Their choice was rewarded with...

    https://nanohub.org/resources/193

  14. Moore's Law Forever?

    13 Jul 2005 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Mark Lundstrom

    This talk covers the big technological changes in the 20th and 21st century that were correctly predicted by Gordon Moore in 1965. Moore's Law states that the number of transistors on a silicon...

    https://nanohub.org/resources/188

  15. Nanoelectronics: The New Frontier?

    18 Apr 2005 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Mark Lundstrom

    After forty years of advances in integrated circuit technology, microelectronics is undergoing a transformation to nanoelectronics. Modern day MOSFETs now have channel lengths of only 50 nm, and...

    https://nanohub.org/resources/185

  16. CMOS Nanotechnology

    07 Jul 2004 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Mark Lundstrom

    In non-specialist language, this talk introduces CMOS technology used for modern electronics. Beginning with an explanation of "CMOS," the speaker relates basic system considerations of transistor...

    https://nanohub.org/resources/166

  17. Transistors

    04 Aug 2004 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Mark Lundstrom

    The transistor is the basic element of electronic systems. The integrated circuits inside today's personal computers, cell phones, PDA's, etc., contain hundreds of millions of transistors on a...

    https://nanohub.org/resources/167

  18. Exponential Challenges, Exponential Rewards - The Future of Moore's Law

    14 Dec 2004 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Shekhar Borkar

    Three exponentials have been the foundation of today's electronics, which are often taken for granted—namely transistor density, performance, and energy. Moore's Law captures the impact of...

    https://nanohub.org/resources/177

  19. Nanoelectronics and the Future of Microelectronics

    22 Aug 2002 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Mark Lundstrom

    Progress in silicon technology continues to outpace the historic pace of Moore's Law, but the end of device scaling now seems to be only 10-15 years away. As a result, there is intense interest in...

    https://nanohub.org/resources/141

nanoHUB.org, a resource for nanoscience and nanotechnology, is supported by the National Science Foundation and other funding agencies. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.