Tags: circuits

Description

In 1973, SPICE was introduced to the world by Professor Donald O. Pederson of the University of California at Berkeley, and a new era of computer-aided design (CAD) tools was born. As its name implies, SPICE is a "Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis." You give it a description of an electrical circuit, made up of resistors, capacitors, inductors, and power sources, and SPICE will predict the performance of that circuit. Instead of bread-boarding new designs in the lab, circuit designers found they could optimize their designs on computers–in effect, using computers to build better computers. Since its introduction, SPICE has been commercialized and released in a dozen variants, such as H-SPICE, P-SPICE, and ADVICE.

Learn more about circuit simulation from the resources on this site, listed below. You might even acquire a taste for SPICE by running examples online.

Resources (21-40 of 51)

  1. SUGAR: the SPICE for MEMS

    21 May 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Jason Clark

    In this seminar, I present some design, modeling, and simulation features of a computer aided engineering tool for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) called SUGAR. For experimental verification, I use a microdevice that is difficult to simulate with conventional MEMS software. I show that the...

  2. Modeling and Analysis of VLSI Interconnects

    10 May 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Cheng-Kok Koh

    With continual technology scaling, the accurate and efficient modeling and simulation of interconnect effects have become problems of central importance. In order to accurately model the distributive effects of interconnects, it is necessary to divide a long wire into several segments, with each...

  3. CMOS-Nano Hybrid Technology: a nanoFPGA-related study

    04 Apr 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Wei Wang

    Dr. Wei Wang received his PhD degree in 2002 from Concordia University, Montreal, QC, Canada, in Electrical and Computer Engineering. From 2002 to 2004, he was an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada....

  4. Nano-CMOS

    06 Feb 2007 | | Contributor(s):: wei zhao, yu cao

    Predictive model files for future transistor technologies.

  5. RF MEMS: Passive Components and Architectures

    02 Jan 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Dimitrios Peroulis

    This seminar is an introduction to the MEMS technology as itapplies to RF and Microwave systems. Besides discussing several key RFMEMS components (switches, varactors, inductors), reconfigurable circuitarchitectures will also be introduced. In addition, reliability and costconsiderations as...

  6. Nanoelectronic Architectures

    24 Feb 2005 |

    Nanoelectronic architectures at this point are necessarily speculative: We are still evaluating many different approaches to fabrication and are exploring unconventional devices made possible at the nano scale. This talk will start off with a review of some "classical" crossbar structures using...

  7. Investigation of the Electrical Characteristics of Triple-Gate FinFETs and Silicon-Nanowire FETs

    08 Aug 2006 | | Contributor(s):: Monica Taba, Gerhard Klimeck

    Electrical characteristics of various Fin field-effect transistors (FinFETs) and silicon-nanowires were analyzed and compared using a modified three-dimensional self-consistent quantum-mechanical simulator in order to investigate device performance. FinFETs have been proposed to fulfill the...

  8. ECE 612 Lecture 2: Introduction to Device Simulation

    08 Aug 2006 | | Contributor(s):: Mark Lundstrom

  9. Nanotubes and Nanowires: One-dimensional Materials

    17 Jul 2006 |

    What is a nanowire? What is a nanotube? Why are they interesting and what are their potential applications? How are they made? This presentation is intended to begin to answer these questions while introducing some fundamental concepts such as wave-particle duality, quantum confinement, the...

  10. History of Semiconductor Engineering

    28 Jun 2006 | | Contributor(s):: Bo Lojek

    When basic researchers started working on semiconductors during the late nineteen thirties and on integrated circuits at the end of the nineteen fifties, they did not know that their work would change the lives of future generations. Very few people at that time recognized the significance of...

  11. Logic Devices and Circuits on Carbon Nanotubes

    05 Apr 2006 | | Contributor(s):: Joerg Appenzeller

    Over the last years carbon nanotubes (CNs) have attracted an increasing interest as building blocks for nano-electronics applications. Due to their unique properties enabling e.g. ballistic transport at room-temperature over several hundred nanometers, high performance CN field-effect...

  12. Switching Energy in CMOS Logic: How far are we from physical limit?

    24 Apr 2006 | | Contributor(s):: Saibal Mukhopadhyay

    Aggressive scaling of CMOS devices in technology generation has resulted in exponential growth in device performance, integration density and computing power. However, the power dissipated by a silicon chip is also increasing in every generation and emerging as a major bottleneck to technology...

  13. Thermal Microsystems for On-Chip Thermal Engineering

    04 Apr 2006 | | Contributor(s):: Suresh V. Garimella

    Electro-thermal co-design at the micro- and nano-scales is critical for achieving desired performance and reliability in microelectronic circuits. Emerging thermal microsystems technologies for this application area are discussed, with specific examples including a novel micromechanical...

  14. Molecular Transport Structures: Elastic Scattering, Vibronic Effects and Beyond

    13 Feb 2006 | | Contributor(s):: Mark Ratner, Abraham Nitzan,

    Current experimental efforts are clarifying quite beautifully the nature of charge transport in so-called molecular junctions, in which a single molecule provides the channel for current flow between two electrodes. The theoretical modeling of such structures is challenging, because of the...

  15. A Primer on Semiconductor Device Simulation

    23 Jan 2006 | | Contributor(s):: Mark Lundstrom

    Computer simulation is now an essential tool for the research and development of semiconductor processes and devices, but to use a simulation tool intelligently, one must know what's "under the hood." This talk is a tutorial introduction designed for someone using semiconductor device simulation...

  16. Homework for Circuit Simulation: ECE 255

    08 Jan 2006 | | Contributor(s):: Gerold Neudeck

    This collection of homeworks is used in ECE 255 "Introduction to Electronic Analysis and Design" (Purdue University). Students do their work, orsometimes check their work, by using the Spice 3F4 simulator on the nanoHUB.

  17. Resonant Tunneling Diodes: an Exercise

    06 Jan 2006 | | Contributor(s):: H.-S. Philip Wong

    This homework assignment was created by H.-S. Philip Wong for EE 218 "Introduction to Nanoelectronics and Nanotechnology" (Stanford University). It includes a couple of simple "warm up" exercises and two design problems, intended to teach students the electronic properties of resonant tunneling...

  18. Atomic Force Microscopy

    01 Dec 2005 | | Contributor(s):: Arvind Raman

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is an indispensible tool in nano science for the fabrication, metrology, manipulation, and property characterization of nanostructures. This tutorial reviews some of the physics of the interaction forces between the nanoscale tip and sample, the dynamics of the...

  19. Fabrication of a MOSFET within a Microprocessor

    16 Nov 2005 |

    This resource depicts the step-by-step process by which the transistors of an integrated circuit are made.

  20. An Electrical Engineering Perspective on Molecular Electronics

    26 Oct 2005 | | Contributor(s):: Mark Lundstrom

    After forty years of advances in integrated circuit technology, microelectronics is undergoing a transformation to nanoelectronics. Modern day MOSFETs now have channel lengths that are less than 50 nm long, and billion transistor logic chips have arrived. Moore's Law continues, but the end of...