Tags: education/outreach

Description

Part of our mission is to help educators incorporate nanotechnology into their offerings.

The following resources are related to education and outreach efforts.

Online Presentations (41-57 of 57)

  1. A Primer on Semiconductor Device Simulation

    23 Jan 2006 | | Contributor(s):: Mark Lundstrom

    Computer simulation is now an essential tool for the research and development of semiconductor processes and devices, but to use a simulation tool intelligently, one must know what's "under the hood." This talk is a tutorial introduction designed for someone using semiconductor device simulation...

  2. Nano-Scale Device Simulations Using PROPHET-Part II: PDE Systems

    20 Jan 2006 | | Contributor(s):: yang liu,

    Part II uses examples toillustrate how to build user-defined PDE systems in PROPHET.

  3. Nano-Scale Device Simulations Using PROPHET-Part I: Basics

    20 Jan 2006 | | Contributor(s):: yang liu,

    Part I covers the basics of PROPHET,including the set-up of simulation structures and parameters based onpre-defined PDE systems.

  4. Nano-Scale Device Simulations Using PROPHET

    20 Jan 2006 | | Contributor(s):: yang liu,

    These two lectures are aimed to give a practical guide to the use of ageneral device simulator (PROPHET) available on nanoHUB. PROPHETis a partial differential equation (PDE) solver that offers usersthe flexibility of integrating new models and equations for theirnano-device simulations. The...

  5. How Can Your Educational Modules Contain Interactive Online Simulation?

    28 Feb 2005 | | Contributor(s):: Gerhard Klimeck

    The Network for Computational Nanotechnology (NCN) is a multi-university, NSF-funded initiative with a mission to lead in research, education, and outreach to students and professionals, while at the same time deploying a unique web-based cyber-infrastructure to serve the nation''s National...

  6. Embedding science and technology education into students' lifestyles and technology choices

    06 Dec 2005 | | Contributor(s):: Krishna Madhavan

    Learning experiences of the future will be multi-sensory, engage technologies and significant computational power continuously and invisibly, and will be completely engaging. The emergence of highly cross-disciplinary fields like nanoscale science and technology, bioinformatics, and...

  7. Atomic Force Microscopy

    01 Dec 2005 | | Contributor(s):: Arvind Raman

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is an indispensible tool in nano science for the fabrication, metrology, manipulation, and property characterization of nanostructures. This tutorial reviews some of the physics of the interaction forces between the nanoscale tip and sample, the dynamics of the...

  8. First Principles-based Atomistic and Mesoscale Modeling of Materials

    01 Dec 2005 | | Contributor(s):: Alejandro Strachan

    This tutorial will describe some of the most powerful and widely used techniques for materials modeling including i) first principles quantum mechanics (QM), ii) large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and iii) mesoscale modeling, together with the strategies to bridge between them....

  9. Simple Theory of the Ballistic MOSFET

    11 Oct 2005 | | Contributor(s):: Mark Lundstrom

    Silicon nanoelectronics has become silicon nanoelectronics, but we still analyze, design, and think about MOSFETs in more or less in the same way that we did 30 years ago. In this talk, I will describe a simple analysis of the ballistic MOSFET. No MOSFET is truly ballistic, but approaching this...

  10. On the Reliability of Micro-Electronic Devices: An Introductory Lecture on Negative Bias Temperature Instability

    28 Sep 2005 | | Contributor(s):: Muhammad A. Alam

    In 1930s Bell Labs scientists chose to focus on Siand Ge, rather than better known semiconductors like Ag2S and Cu2S, mostly because of their reliable performance. Their choice was rewarded with the invention of bipolar transistors several years later. In 1960s, scientists at Fairchild worked...

  11. Quantum Dots

    21 Jul 2005 | | Contributor(s):: Gerhard Klimeck

    Quantum Dots are man-made artificial atoms that confine electrons to a small space. As such, they have atomic-like behavior and enable the study of quantum mechanical effects on a length scale that is around 100 times larger than the pure atomic scale. Quantum dots offer application...

  12. Parallel Computing for Realistic Nanoelectronic Simulations

    12 Sep 2005 | | Contributor(s):: Gerhard Klimeck

    Typical modeling and simulation efforts directed towards the understanding of electron transport at the nanometer scale utilize single workstations as computational engines. Growing understanding of the involved physics and the need to model realistically extended devices increases the...

  13. Moore's Law Forever?

    13 Jul 2005 | | Contributor(s):: Mark Lundstrom

    This talk covers the big technological changes in the 20th and 21st century that were correctly predicted by Gordon Moore in 1965. Moore's Law states that the number of transistors on a silicon chip doubles every technology generation. In 1960s terms that meant every 12 months and currently this...

  14. CMOS Nanotechnology

    07 Jul 2004 | | Contributor(s):: Mark Lundstrom

    In non-specialist language, this talk introduces CMOS technology used for modern electronics. Beginning with an explanation of "CMOS," the speaker relates basic system considerations of transistor design and identifies future challenges for CMOS electronics. Anyone with an elementary...

  15. Transistors

    04 Aug 2004 | | Contributor(s):: Mark Lundstrom

    The transistor is the basic element of electronic systems. The integrated circuits inside today's personal computers, cell phones, PDA's, etc., contain hundreds of millions of transistors on a chip of silicon about 2 cm on a side. Each technology generation, engineers shrink the size of...

  16. Scientific Computing with Python

    24 Oct 2004 | | Contributor(s):: Eric Jones, Travis Oliphant

    INSTRUCTORS: Eric Jones and Travis Oliphant.Sunday, October 24, 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.Room 322, Stewart CenterPython has emerged as an excellent choice for scientific computing because of its simple syntax, ease of use, and elegant multi-dimensional array arithmetic. Its interpreted evaluation...

  17. Electronic Transport in Semiconductors (Introductory Lecture)

    25 Aug 2004 | | Contributor(s):: Mark Lundstrom

    Welcome to the ECE 656 Introductory lecture. The objective of the course is to develop a clear, physical understanding of charge carrier transport in bulk semiconductors and in small semiconductor devices.The emphasis is on transport physics and its consequences in a device context. The course...