Tags: nanoelectronics

Description

Progress in technology has brought microelectronics to the nanoscale, but nanoelectronics is not yet a well-defined engineering discipline with a coherent, experimentally verified, theoretical framework. The NCN has a vision for a new, 'bottom-up' approach to electronics, which involves: understanding electronic conduction at the atomistic level; formulating new simulation techniques; developing a new generation of software tools; and bringing this new understanding and perspective into the classroom. We address problems in atomistic phenomena, quantum transport, percolative transport in inhomogeneous media, reliability, and the connection of nanoelectronics to new problems such as biology, medicine, and energy. We work closely with experimentalists to understand nanoscale phenomena and to explore new device concepts. In the course of this work, we produce open source software tools and educational resources that we share with the community through the nanoHUB.

This page is a starting point for nanoHUB users interested in nanoelectronics. It lists key resources developed by the NCN Nanoelectronics team. The nanoHUB contains many more resources for nanoelectronics, and they can be located with the nanoHUB search function. To find all nanoelectronics resources, search for 'nanoelectronics.' To find those contributed by the NCN nanoelectronics team, search for 'NCNnanoelectronics.' More information on Nanoelectronics can be found here.

All Categories (2001-2020 of 2050)

  1. NanoMOS 2.5 Source Code Download

    22 Feb 2005 | | Contributor(s):: , Sebastien Goasguen

    NanoMOS is a 2-D simulator for thin body (less than 5 nm), fully depleted, double-gated n-MOSFETs. A choice of five transport models is available (drift-diffusion, classical ballistic, energy transport, quantum ballistic, and quantum diffusive). The transport models treat quantum effects in the...

  2. Nanotechnology 501 Lecture Series

    22 Feb 2005 | | Contributor(s):: Gerhard Klimeck (editor), Mark Lundstrom (editor), Joseph M. Cychosz (editor)

    Welcome to Nanotechnology 501, a series of lectures designed to provide an introduction to nanotechnology. This series is similar to our popular lecture series Nanotechnology 101, but it is directed at the graduate students and professionals.

  3. Electrical Resistance: An Atomistic View

    09 Jul 2003 | | Contributor(s):: Supriyo Datta

    Electrical Resistance: An Atomistic View

  4. Huckel-IV on the nanoHub

    09 Jul 2003 | | Contributor(s):: Magnus Paulsson, Ferdows Zahid, Supriyo Datta

    Huckel-IV on the nanoHub

  5. Measuring Molecular Conductance: A Review of Experimental Approaches

    09 Jul 2003 | | Contributor(s):: Ron Reifenberger

    Measuring Molecular Conductance: A Review of Experimental Approaches

  6. Simulating Electronic Conduction Through the NanoHub

    09 Jul 2003 | | Contributor(s):: Sebastien Goasguen

    Simulating Electronic Conduction Through the nanoHUB

  7. Probing Molecular Conduction with Scanning Probe Microscopy

    08 Jul 2004 |

    This tutorial will provide an overview of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) andits application towards problems in molecular conduction. In an effort to communicatethe power and limitations of these instruments, the tutorial will describe designconsiderations and reveal the detailed construction...

  8. Quantum Chemistry Part I

    08 Jul 2004 | | Contributor(s):: Mark Ratner

    This tutorial will provide an overview of electronic structure calculations from achemist's perspective. This will include a review of the basic electronic structuretheories.

  9. Understanding Molecular Conduction

    08 Jul 2004 | | Contributor(s):: Supriyo Datta

    It is common to differentiate between two ways of building a nanodevice: a topdown approach where we start from something big and chisel out what we want and abottom-up approach where we start from something small like atoms or molecules andassemble what we want. When it comes to describing...

  10. Curriculum on Nanotechnology

    27 Jan 2005 |

    To exploit the opportunities that nanoscience is giving us, engineers will need to learn how to think about materials, devices, circuits, and systems in new ways. The NCN seeks to bring the new understanding emerging from research in nanoscience into the graduate and undergraduate curriculum....

  11. Exponential Challenges, Exponential Rewards - The Future of Moore's Law

    14 Dec 2004 |

    Three exponentials have been the foundation of today's electronics, which are often taken for granted—namely transistor density, performance, and energy. Moore's Law captures the impact of these exponentials. Exponentially increasing transistor integration capacity, and exponentially...

  12. NEMO 1-D: The First NEGF-based TCAD Tool and Network for Computational Nanotechnology

    28 Dec 2004 | | Contributor(s):: Gerhard Klimeck

    Nanotechnology has received a lot of public attention since U.S. President Clinton announced the U.S.National Nanotechnology Initiative. New approaches to applications in electronics, materials,medicine, biology and a variety of other areas will be developed in this new multi-disciplinary...

  13. Nanotechnology 101 Lecture Series

    25 Aug 2004 |

    Welcome to Nanotechnology 101, a series of lectures designed to provide an undergraduate-level introduction to nanotechnology. In contrast, the Nanotechnology 501 series offers lectures for the graduate-level and professional audiences.

  14. Electronic Transport in Semiconductors (Introductory Lecture)

    25 Aug 2004 | | Contributor(s):: Mark Lundstrom

    Welcome to the ECE 656 Introductory lecture. The objective of the course is to develop a clear, physical understanding of charge carrier transport in bulk semiconductors and in small semiconductor devices.The emphasis is on transport physics and its consequences in a device context. The course...

  15. Process Variation: An Evalution of Carbon Nanotube Transistor Field Effect Transistors

    16 Aug 2004 | | Contributor(s):: , ,

    Process variation is the observed deviation of device parameters in mass production processes. As the critical dimensions of today's MOSFET's are continously decreasing, process variation is becoming an increased problem.

  16. Modification of Si(111) Surfaces using Self - Assembled Monolayers (SAMs) for Electrochemical and AF

    16 Aug 2004 |

    Recent researchers in the electrical engineering field are using self-assembled monolayers techniques with aryldiazonium salts solutions to build nanoelectronic devices. This innovation can explain the molecular conductivity and the chemical covalent bonds between π- conjugated orbitals of the...

  17. Hydrodynamic Separation of Micron-sized Particles through Magnetization

    16 Aug 2004 |

    Many assays and lab-on-a-chip projects require the use of uniform magnetic particles. Creating magnetic particles of uniform size and magnetization is a difficult task. The next best alternative is to make a distribution of particles and separate them.

  18. Visualization of CNT FET Electrical Field Lines

    15 Aug 2004 | | Contributor(s):: ,

    With transistors decreasing to nanometric dimensions, limits of current processing technologies are being reached. Many physical obstacles still need to be overcome to replace earlier silicon devices with Carbon NanoTube Field Effect Transistors (CNT FETs).

  19. Quantum Dots Visualization Software using Electron Wave Function

    15 Aug 2004 | | Contributor(s):: Patrick Macnamara,

    The viewing of electron orbitals is a necessary element in the investigation of quantum dot structures as well as in their conceptualization. With an electron wave function superimposed over a crystalline quantum dot structure containing a million to three million atoms, we adapted the marching...

  20. Visualization of and Educational Tool for Quantum Dots

    15 Aug 2004 | | Contributor(s):: Aaron Christensen, Adrian Rios

    Quantum dots (QDs) are confined structures made of metals and semiconductors that are capable of containing free electrons.The ability to visualize these small devices is advantageous in determining probable electron orbitals and in observing information not easily conceived in raw datasets.