Changes between Version 1 and Version 2 of GettingStarted


Ignore:
Timestamp:
01/30/09 14:11:25 (5 years ago)
Author:
admin
Comment:

Updated subversion path to https://nanohub.org/tools/nanowire/svn/trunk

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
Modified
  • GettingStarted

    v1 v2  
    1212Once Subversion is installed, you download Nanowires as follows: 
    1313{{{ 
    14 % svn checkout https://repo.nanohub.org/svn/app-nanowire/trunk app-nanowire 
     14% svn checkout https://nanohub.org/tools/nanowire/svn/trunk nanowire 
    1515}}} 
    1616 
    17 The {{{checkout}}} command makes a local copy of the entire Nanowires source tree into your current working directory as a subdirectory called {{{app-nanowire}}}.  By requesting {{{.../app-nanowire/trunk}}}, you get the main development trunk, which should have the latest stable code. 
     17The {{{checkout}}} command makes a local copy of the entire Nanowires source tree into your current working directory as a subdirectory called {{{app-nanowire}}}.  By requesting {{{.../nanowire/svn/trunk}}}, you get the main development trunk, which should have the latest stable code. 
    1818 
    1919== Making Changes == 
     
    2121Once you've downloaded the code, you can make whatever changes you like.  For example, you might edit a file to fix a bug or add some code.  To make your changes permanent, you must {{{commit}} them to the repository as follows: 
    2222{{{ 
    23 % cd app-nanowire 
     23% cd nanowire 
    2424% svn commit --message "fixed my first bug!" 
    2525}}} 
    2626You don't have to include the optional {{{--message}}} argument.  If you just say {{{svn commit}}}, Subversion will prompt you for comments in your favorite editor, and you can type much more. 
    2727 
    28 It's best to commit at the top of the source tree--that's why we said "{{{cd app-nanowire}}}" in the example above.  When you commit at the top of the tree, Subversion will search everything below, find all files that have changed, and commit them all at once.  Committing a change makes it permanent.  Once committed, other developers will see the change.  If for some reason, you want to throw away your changes and start fresh, you can simply remove your source tree and check it out all over again.  Or, you may want to remove just a few files that you've modified, and then {{{update}}} (as we'll see below) to replace the missing files with their previous version. 
     28It's best to commit at the top of the source tree--that's why we said "{{{cd nanowire}}}" in the example above.  When you commit at the top of the tree, Subversion will search everything below, find all files that have changed, and commit them all at once.  Committing a change makes it permanent.  Once committed, other developers will see the change.  If for some reason, you want to throw away your changes and start fresh, you can simply remove your source tree and check it out all over again.  Or, you may want to remove just a few files that you've modified, and then {{{update}}} (as we'll see below) to replace the missing files with their previous version. 
    2929 
    3030From time to time, you and another developer will modify the same file at the same time.  Suppose the other developer checks in his changes first.  When you try to commit, you'll get an error saying that your file is out-of-date.  In that case, you need to {{{update}}} before committing.  You can do that as follows: 
    3131{{{ 
    32 % cd app-nanowire 
     32% cd nanowire 
    3333% svn update 
    3434}}} 
    35 It's best to update at the top of the source tree--just like commit.  That's why we said "{{{cd app-nanowire}}}" in the example above.  When you update at the top of the tree, Subversion will search everything below, adding any new files, replacing any missing files, and integrating changes made by other developers.  Once all files are properly updated, you can commit your changes again, and this time, it will work. 
     35It's best to update at the top of the source tree--just like commit.  That's why we said "{{{cd nanowire}}}" in the example above.  When you update at the top of the tree, Subversion will search everything below, adding any new files, replacing any missing files, and integrating changes made by other developers.  Once all files are properly updated, you can commit your changes again, and this time, it will work.