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Tool-Powered Curricula

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Educators:

Use Tool-Powered Curriculum to augment existing courses and enhance the student learning. Use turn-key simulation tools to teach concepts, design, and optimization, without reading big manuals and installing software. An instructor can use this tool in their classroom or for student assignments. ABACUS and AQME are tools which pull together many different nanoHUB tools into a single interface and are augmented with homework and project assignments. Solutions to homework assignments are available to Educators by request.

"... and more": Augment your class though interactive lectures from leading researchers providing tool tutorials, nano101 and nano501 lectures, Connect to Use community contributed homework and project assignments in your class. Most lectures are available for interactive online viewing, as pdf downloads, and even podcasts.

Show a student and they will remember; involve them, and they will understand.

Students:

Enjoy using intuitive and user-friendly tools without software installation and reading massive manuals! You will be able to ask "what if?" questions and get answers rapidly to develop intuition and insight.

Register for a free nanoHUB account or log into your existing nanoHUB account and begin teaching and learning with the tool powered curriculum.

ABACUS - Assembly of Basic Applications for the Coordinated Understanding of Semiconductors alt

The curriculum entitled "Introduction to Semiconductor Devices" is powered by the tool ABACUS. The ABACUS powered curriculum is designed to enhance the learning experience of students in existing classes on semiconductor devices in Electrical Engineering curricula. ABACUS is an assembly of different nanoHUB tools that range from crystals, bandstructure, pn junctions, and transistors.

The ABACUS powered curriculum is a curated page that provides easy access to a variety of different homework and project assignments that are relevant for the teaching of semiconductor devices. Educators can request access to homework solutions. Any community members are encouraged to contribute content to the nanoHUB. We encourage you to alert the authors of the curated page to your contribution for possible inclusion.


AQME - Advancing Quantum Mechanics for Engineers alt

The curriculum entitled Advancing Quantum Mechanics for Engineers is powered by the AQME tool which is an assembly of tools we believe are useful in the teaching of introductory quantum mechanical principles in an electrical engineering or physics curriculum. Commercial semiconductor devices have become as small as a few tens of nanometers and understanding basic quantum mechanical principles of quantization, bands, and tunneling are of critical importance.

The AQME powered curriculum is a curated page that provides access to a variety of different homework and project assignments that are relevant for quantum mechanical principles. Educators can request access to homework solutions. Any community members are encouraged to contribute content to the nanoHUB. We encourage you to alert the authors of the curated page to your contribution for possible inclusion.


Overview of Computational Nanoscience alt

The Berkeley Overview of Computational Nanoscience, is designed to introduce a broad range of computational tools under a self-contained nanoHUB tool. This friendly introduction to classical, quantum, and statistical methods provides easy-to-understand interfaces to powerful codes including molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo methods, density functional theory, and quantum chemistry. The tool can be used in conjunction with the Berkeley Computational Nanoscience course lectures, also available on the nanoHUB, which introduce the techniques and present in-class demonstrations and homework assignments designed for use with the Berkeley Nanotechnology Tool Kit.


ANTSY - Assembly for Nanotechnology Survey Courses alt

The curriculum entitled Assembly for Nanotechnology Survey Courses is powered by the ANTSY tool which is an assembly of tools we believe are useful in the teaching and understanding of simple and often discussed nanotechnology devices such as bucky balls, carbon nanotubes, graphene, quantum dots, and resonant tunneling diodes.

The ANTSY powered curriculum is a curated page that provides access to a variety of different homework and project assignments that are relevant for quantum mechanical principles. Educators can request access to homework solutions. Any community members are encouraged to contribute content to the nanoHUB. We encourage you to alert the authors of the curated page to your contribution for possible inclusion.


ACUTE -Assembly for Computational Electronics alt

The purpose of the ACUTE tool-based curricula is to introduce interested scientists from Academia and Industry in advanced simulation methods needed for proper modeling of state-of-the-art nanoscale devices. The multiple scale transport in doped semiconductors is summarized in the figure below in terms of the transport regimes, relative importance of the scattering mechanisms and possible applications.


General Chemistry alt

Advanced Quantum Chemistry tools are generally hard to use and cannot be used in a freshmen teaching environment, where conceptual understanding rather than the teaching of cryptic tool languages is critical. The nanoHUB software development and deployment environment can overcome this handicap and a set of tools that can be used in the teaching of Freshman chemistry has been developed. Northwestern University has assembled a set of tools and homework for this purpose.

All freshman chemistry students at Northwestern (around 800 students) used nanoHUB this year for projects concerning QC-Lab, the Nanosphere Optics Lab and INDO/CNDO codes. These projects were done as part of the laboratory program (where the students actually get to mix chemicals together and make the nanoparticles that are being modeled by the computer codes). Introductory material is provided in the lecture part of the courses. This program is under the leadership of Prof. George Schatz and Dr. Marcelo Carignano, but is mostly implemented by Northwestern University staff that are not supported by NCN.


Quantum Chemistry for Engineers alt

Electronic structure calculations play a major role in engineering, especially in applications related to electronics, biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, combustion reactions and nanotechnology. While the complications and details of the calculation schemes are very important for advanced students in theoretical chemistry and physics, they are less important for students majoring in engineering or material science. Northwestern University offers a set of problems to be solved using nanoHUB tools that are relevant to engineering students taking courses in electronic structure theory. Each assignment has been designed so that it can be solved in a single online session. All the auxiliary files needed to complete the assignments are provided.

nanoHUB.org, a resource for nanoscience and nanotechnology, is supported by the National Science Foundation and other funding agencies. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.