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Nanoelectronics and the Meaning of Resistance

By Supriyo Datta

Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

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Courses

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Abstract

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The purpose of this series of lectures is to introduce the "bottom-up" approach to nanoelectronics using concrete examples. No prior knowledge of quantum mechanics or statistical mechanics is assumed; however, familiarity with matrix algebra will be helpful for some topics.

Day 1: What and where is the resistance?
Day 2: Quantum transport
Day 3: Spins and magnets
Day 4: Maxwell's demon
Day 5: Correlations and entanglement

Romanian translation of this page.

Bio

Supriyo Datta Supriyo Datta received his B.Tech. from the Indian Institute of Technology in Kharagpur, India in 1975 and his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1979. In 1981, he joined Purdue University, where he is (since 1999) the Thomas Duncan Distinguished Professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He started his career in the field of ultrasonics and was selected by the Ultrasonics group as its outstanding young engineer to receive an IEEE Centennial Key to the Future Award and by the ASEE to receive the Terman Award for his book on Surface Acoustic Wave Devices.

Since 1985 he has focused on current flow in nanoscale electronic devices and is well-known for his contributions to spin electronics and molecular electronics. Datta's most important contribution, however, is the approach his group has pioneered for the description of quantum transport far from equilibrium, combining the non-equlibrium Green function (NEGF) formalism of many-body physics with the Landauer formalism from mesoscopic physics as described in his books Electronic Transport in Mesoscopic Systems (Cambridge, 1995), and Quantum Transport: Atom to Transistor (Cambridge, 2005).

Datta's unique approach to the problem of quantum transport has not only had a significant impact on nanoelectronics research but also on graduate and undergraduate curriculum development in the area. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS) as well as the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and has received IEEE Technical Field Awards both for research and for graduate teaching.

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Publications

  • Cover image

    Quantum Transport: Atom to Transistor

    by Supriyo Datta (Cambridge - July 11, 2005)

    This book presents a unique approach to the fundamentals of quantum transport, and is aimed at senior undergraduate and graduate students. Some of the most advanced concepts of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics are included and yet no prior acquaintance with quantum mechanics is assumed.

Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Supriyo Datta (2008), "Nanoelectronics and the Meaning of Resistance," http://nanohub.org/resources/5279.

    BibTex | EndNote

Tags

Lecture Number/Topic Online Lecture Video Lecture Notes Supplemental Material Suggested Exercises
Introduction: Nanoelectronics and the meaning of resistance View Flash View
Lecture 1A: What and where is the resistance? View Flash View Notes
Lecture 1B: What and where is the resistance? View Flash View Notes
Lecture 2A: Quantum Transport View Flash View Notes
Lecture 2B: Quantum Transport View Flash View Notes
Lecture 3A: Spin Transport View Flash View Notes
Lecture 3B: Spin Transport View Flash View Notes
Lecture 4A: Energy Exchange and Maxwell's Demon View Flash View Notes
Lecture 4B: Energy Exchange and Maxwell’s Demon View Flash View Notes
Lecture 5A: Correlations and Entanglement View Lecture Handout
Lecture 5B: Correlations and Entanglement View Lecture Handout
Nanoelectronics and the meaning of resistance: Course Handout and Exercises Course Handout and Exercises
Handout with reference list, MATLAB scripts and exercise problems.

Spins and Magnets (Whiteboard lecture), Part 1 View Lecture Notes (1&2)
Whiteboard version of approximately the same material covered in Lectures 3A/3B.

Spins and Magnets (Whiteboard lecture), Part 2 View Lecture Notes (1&2)
Whiteboard version of approximately the same material covered in Lectures 3A/3B.

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