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The Berkeley Model Development Environment: A MATLAB-based Platform for Modeling and Analyzing Nanoscale Devices and Circuits

By Tianshi Wang1, Jaijeet Roychowdhury1

1. EECS, University of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, CA

Published on

Abstract

We present the Berkeley Model Development Environment (MDE) -- a free, extensible, and well-documented MATLAB-based system for rapidly modeling, analyzing, simulating, testing and debugging fully-general electronic devices and components. MDE provides end-users (e.g., device modelers and circuit designers) with a MATLAB API, a set of routines and data structures allowing users to quickly specify mathematical models for their devices and components (e.g., as systems of equations).

Furthermore, by leveraging the power of the general-purpose programmability, plotting/visualization functions, and scriptability of MATLAB (as opposed to the limited functions/capabilities provided by alternatives like SPICE/Verilog), MDE makes it convenient to analyze, simulate, test, and debug device and circuit models (e.g., by running standard AC, DC, and TRAN analyses, or user-defined, custom tests), before deployment.

In this talk, we will provide a tutorial-style introduction to MDE, including how to use it to create and analyze custom device models.

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Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Tianshi Wang; Jaijeet Roychowdhury (2014), "The Berkeley Model Development Environment: A MATLAB-based Platform for Modeling and Analyzing Nanoscale Devices and Circuits," https://nanohub.org/resources/20137.

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Time

Location

NEEDS e-Seminar

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